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How sleeping less than 6 hours affects your health After being awake for almost 14-16 hours, our body demands sleep. Minimum sleeping time required for a healthy mind and body is 7-8 hours. Although, this duration varies according to age. Because generally speaking, where a child can sleep for 12-14 hours, grownups can sleep for not more than 9 hours. Sound sleep is very essential otherwise, it can be harmful for our health. Let’s see how sleeping for less than 6 hours affects our health. Headache, weight gain and poor vision: When you sleep for less than 6 hours a day, it can not only give you headache all the time but can lead to a poor vision also. And if continued for a long time, may hamper your eyesight. The lesser you sleep the more weight you gain. And after-effects of gaining weight could be even more hazardous. Memory loss, heart disease, infection: Sleeplessness can have an adverse effect on one’s memory too. A person may find it difficult to remember even simple things. Also, infections can take a longer time to heal because sleep is something that stabilises and balances everything that goes wrong while we are awake. If we don’t get proper sleep, the process of healing takes longer. Lack of sleep can also elevate blood pressure which ultimately affects the heart. Urine overproduction, stammering and accident: Sleeping slows down urinating process but when you are awake for longer hours, you might have to urinate more than usual. Lack of sleep can also make you stammer while speaking. If lack of sleep continues, you may not be able to communicate properly. When you do not have sound sleep, your mental condition would not be stable because of declining concentration. You can be accident prone if you drive in such a condition. These are just a few of the ill effects. Sleeping for less than 5 hours is far more dangerous than you can even think. From behavioural to mental to physical effects, it can harm you in many more ways, So, have a sound sleep to avoid complications in life.
THE BEST DIABETOLOGIST DOCTORS NEAR ME Nephrotic syndrome Nephrotic syndrome is a group of symptoms that, together, show that your kidneys are not working as well as they should. These symptoms include: Too much protein in your urine Too little protein in your blood Too much cholesterol in your blood High levels of triglycerides in your blood Swelling in your legs, feet and ankles Everyone needs protein to live. There are many kinds of protein and your body uses protein in many ways, including building bones, muscles and other tissues, and fighting infections. When your kidneys aren’t working well, they let a protein called albumin get through their filters into your urine. Albumin helps your body get rid of extra fluid. When you don’t have enough albumin in your blood, fluid can build up in your body, causing swelling in your legs, feet and ankles.
THE MOST POPULAR DOCTORS NEAR ME Congenital Diseases and Childhood Nephrotic Syndrome Congenital nephrotic syndrome is rare and affects infants in the first 3 months of life. This type of nephrotic syndrome, sometimes called infantile nephrotic syndrome, can be caused by inherited genetic defects, which are problems passed from parent to child through genes infections at the time of birth More information about underlying diseases or infections that cause changes in kidney function is provided in the NIDDK health topic, Glomerular Diseases. What are the signs and symptoms of childhood nephrotic syndrome? The signs and symptoms of childhood nephrotic syndrome may include edema—swelling, most often in the legs, feet, or ankles and less often in the hands or face albuminuria—when a child’s urine has high levels of albumin hypoalbuminemia—when a child’s blood has low levels of albumin hyperlipidemia—when a child’s blood cholesterol and fat levels are higher than normal In addition, some children with nephrotic syndrome may have blood in their urine symptoms of infection, such as fever, lethargy, irritability, or abdominal pain loss of appetite diarrhea high blood pressure
This ordinarily consists of monitoring of  is suspected. heart rate and rhythm,  repeated measurement of systemic arterial pressure by cuff,  obtaining chest radiographs to detect heart failure,  repeated auscultation of the lung fields for pulmonary congestion,  measurement of urine flow,  examination of the skin and mucous membranes for evidence of the adequacy of perfusion, and
DIABETIC SPECIALIST IN YALAHANKA Syncope and dizziness The history Syncope is a transient loss of consciousness resulting from cerebral anoxia, usually due to inadequate blood flow. Syncope may represent a simple faint or be a symptom of cardiac or neurological disease. Establish whether the patient actually loses consciousness and under what circumstances the syncope occurs—for example, on standing for prolonged periods or standing up suddenly (postural syncope), while passing urine (micturition syncope), on coughing (tussive syncope) or with sudden emotional stress (vasovagal syncope). Find out whether there is any warning such as dizziness or palpitations, and how long the episodes last. Recovery may be spontaneous or require attention from bystanders. Bystanders may also have noticed abnormal movements if the patient has epilepsy, but these can also occur in primary syncope. If the patient’s symptoms appear to be postural, enquire about the use of anti-hypertensive or anti-anginal drugs and other medications that may induce postural hypotension. If the episode is vasovagal, it may be precipitated by something unpleasant like the sight of blood, or it may occur in a hot crowded room; patients often feel nauseated and sweaty before fainting and may have had prior similar episodes, especially during adolescence and young adulthood. The diagnosis of this relatively benign and very common cause of syncope can usually be made from the history. Patients with very typical symptoms rarely require extensive investigations. If syncope is due to an arrhythmia there is often sudden loss of consciousness regardless of the patient’s posture. A history of rapid and irregular palpitations or a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation in the past suggests the possibility of sick sinus syndrome. These patients have intermittent tachycardia, usually due to atrial fibrillation, and episodes of profound bradycardia, often due to complete heart block. Chest pain may also occur if the patient has aortic stenosis or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Exertional syncope may occur in these patients because of obstruction to left ventricular outflow by aortic stenosis or septal hypertrophy . Dizziness that occurs even when the patient is lying down or that is made worse by movements of the head is more likely to be of neurological origin (vertigo), although recurrent tachyarrhythmias may occasionally cause dizziness in any position. Try to decide whether the dizziness is really vertiginous (there is a sensation of movement or spinning of the surroundings or the patient’s head), or whether it is a presyncopal feeling. A family history of syncope or sudden death raises the possibility of an ion channel abnormality (long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy). Attempts should be made to find out what the diagnosis was for the affected relatives. A past history of severe structural heart disease, especially heart failure,
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