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THE BEST CARDIOLOGISTS IN YELAHANKAMedical treatment of stable angina Treatment of any disease must begin with a thorough explanation of the likely diagnosis, severity and prognosis. The possible investigations required and steps to be taken if symptoms persist despite treatment should be outlined. A warning (firm, but not alarming) should be given that a prolonged episode of chest pain (more than about 15 minutes) should prompt the patient to get to a hospital without delay. This may also be the first opportunity to speak to the patient about the control of risk factors (e.g. smoking, hyperlipidaemia) that will be important for the long-term prognosis. Risk factor assessment should form part of this initial consultation and include a request for measurement of the serum lipids . a b (a) An MDCT scan of a diseased right coronary artery and the corresponding coronary angiogram (b) An MDCT reconstructed image of the heart and great vessels 140 PRACTICAL CARDIOLOGY A patient with symptoms typical of angina but who seems stable enough not to need admission to hospital should be started on treatment while awaiting investigations to confirm the diagnosis (usually stress testing). Treatment should aim to improve symptoms and, if possible, improve the prognosis (i.e. reduce the risk of unstable angina, infarction or death). Some drugs that help control the symptoms of angina may also improve the prognosis; other treatment may help the longer-term outlook by improving risk factors. Anti-platelet
The causes of coronary symptoms The symptoms of coronary artery disease are caused by the reduction of myocardial perfusion that results from narrowing of the lumen of one or more of the coronary arteries. This narrowing is most often the result of atherosclerosis. Other much less common causes include: 1 coronary artery spasm (p. 146) (often in an already diseased segment of artery but sometimes as a result of the use of cocaine) 2 thrombosis (usually on an already diseased, or occasionally aneurismal, segment) 3 embolism (e.g. from an infected aortic valve) 4 congenital coronary abnormality
The causes of coronary symptoms The symptoms of coronary artery disease are caused by the reduction of myocardial perfusion that results from narrowing of the lumen of one or more of the coronary arteries. This narrowing is most often the result of atherosclerosis. Other much less common causes include: 1 coronary artery spasm (p. 146) (often in an already diseased segment of artery but sometimes as a result of the use of cocaine) 2 thrombosis (usually on an already diseased, or occasionally aneurismal, segment) 3 embolism (e.g. from an infected aortic valve) 4 congenital coronary abnormality HEART SPECIALIST IN YELAHANKA
CARDIOLOGIST IN SAHAKARANAGAR The causes of coronary symptoms The symptoms of coronary artery disease are caused by the reduction of myocardial perfusion that results from narrowing of the lumen of one or more of the coronary arteries. This narrowing is most often the result of atherosclerosis. Other much less common causes include: 1 coronary artery spasm (p. 146) (often in an already diseased segment of artery but sometimes as a result of the use of cocaine) 2 thrombosis (usually on an already diseased, or occasionally aneurismal, segment) 3 embolism (e.g. from an infected aortic valve) 4 congenital coronary abnormality 5 vasculitis.
THE BEST HEART SPECIALISTS IN BANGALORE Angioplasty Balloon dilatation of coronary artery stenoses was first performed in the late 1970s by Andreas Grunzig. The technique has undergone many refinements and is now widely used for the treatment of angina not responding to medical treatment. Angioplasty has not been shown to improve the prognosis of patients with stable angina. Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) has similarly not been shown to prolong life for most stable angina patients. However, both treatments are very successful in relieving the symptoms of angina. The COURAGE Trial compared optimal medical treatment of angina with angioplasty but excluded patients with symptoms refractory to medical treatment.1 Not surprisingly, this group of stable mild angina patients had a similar outcome with angioplasty and medical treatment. The trial suggests that compared with optimal medical treatment, angioplasty is a safe and slightly more effective treatment for stable angina. Patients can make an informed choice between these two treatments. The majority of patients treated with angioplasty in Australia have acute coronary syndromes and here there is good evidence of prognostic benefit with angioplasty compared with medical treatment. In many centres one-, two- and complicated three-vessel disease are managed this way. It has been shown to be as effective as coronary surgery for these patients but at the price of a higher rate of re-intervention. This is because the greatest limitation of angioplasty is the rate of restenosis in vessels that have been dilated. Restenosis
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