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POPULAR CARDIOLOGIST IN AMRUTHA HALLI , BANGALORE Assessment of patients with hypertension A patient with definite or possible newly diagnosed hypertension needs at least a basic clinical assessment to look for possible aetiology, severity and signs of complications. The history Questioning should be directed towards the following areas. 1 Past history. Has hypertension been diagnosed before? What treatment was instituted? Why was it stopped? 2 Secondary causes. Important questions relate to: • a history of renal disease in the patient or his or her family, recurrent urinary tract infec-­ tions, heavy analgesic use or conditions leading to renal disease (e.g. systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)) • symptoms suggesting phaeochromocytoma (flushing, sweats, palpitations) • symptoms suggesting sleep apnoea • muscle weakness suggesting the hypokalaemia of hyperaldosteronism • Cushing’s syndrome (weight gain, skin changes) • family history of hypertension. 3 Aggravating factors: • high salt intake • high alcohol intake • lack of exercise • use of medications: NSAIDs, appetite suppressants, nasal decongestants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, ergotamine, cyclosporin, oestrogen-containing contraceptive pills • other: use of cocaine, liquorice, amphetamines. 4 Target organ damage: • stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) • angina, dyspnoea • fatigue, oliguria • visual disturbance • claudication. 5 Coexisting risk factors: • smoking • diabetes • lipid levels, if known
Average reductions in coronary events (benefits are greatest in patients with highest total risk) 1 Smoking cessation: 50% reduction in coronary events6 2 Low-dose aspirin in high-risk patients: 25% reduction in coronary events7 3 20% reduction in total cholesterol with statin treatment: 30% reduction in coronary events8 4 Treatment with pravastatin after acute coronary events: 22% reduction in mortality9 5 5–6 mmHg reduction in blood pressure: 15% reduction in coronary events (40% risk reduction for stroke)10 6 30 minutes of moderate exercise a day: 18% reduction in coronary events11 CARDIAC SPEACIALIST IN HEBBALA
HEART SPEACIALISTS IN BANGALORE Stress echocardiography Ischaemic areas of myocardium are known to have reduced contraction compared with normal areas. This can be demonstrated by high-quality echocardiograms. A number of standard views of the heart are obtained and the wall is divided into regions that are assessed for reduced motion. The echo equipment must be designed to store rest images and to present them next to stress images on a split screen so that direct comparison can be made. The stress can be provided by exercise or dobutamine infusion. Exercise echocardiography is difficult to perform because of movement problems and there is quite high inter-reporter variability, but both techniques can approach the accuracy of sestamibi testing in experienced hands. It is not possible to obtain images of adequate quality in all patients.
Cardiologist in Rajanukunte, Bangalore • Factors that increase triglyceride levels 1 Obesity 2 Alcohol 3 Diabetes 4 Oestrogen (including HRT in 20% of users) 5 Diuretics 6 Beta-blockers Secondary causes: • Cushing’s syndrome • acromegaly • uraemia • acute hepatitis
CARDIOLOGIST IN YELAHANKA SECOND DEGREE AV BLICK There are two basic types of second-degree AV block: AV nodal Möbitz type I (Wenckebach) heart block, and the more distal and more sinister Möbitz type II heart block. Möbitz type I heart block is much more common. In Möbitz type I block the PR interval lengthens progressively with each cardiac cycle, until an atrial wave is not conducted. There is recovery of conduction and the next a wave is conducted with a shorter interval and the cycle begins again. The QRS complex is narrow (Fig 3.10) (unless associated with pre-existing BBB). The increment is largest between the first and second conducted P wave, and the PR interval continues to increase by less and less until a P wave is dropped. Möbitz type II heart block is almost always associated with a BBB (Fig 3.11), since its origin is intraventricular (below the AV node), and it tends to lapse suddenly into extreme bradycardia or asystole. It tends to be over-diagnosed, especially in the setting of 2:1 AV block (Fig 3.12). There is no lengthening of the PR interval before an atrial wave is not conducted. At times, atropine or exercise can demonstrate the site of the block, by increasing the block from 2:1 to a higher grade when the underlying mechanism is Möbitz II. Conversely, Wenckebach conduction may improve to 3:2 or better. For a distinction to be made between Möbitz type I and Möbitz type II, at least two consecutively conducted P waves have to be evaluated. This is impossible in 2:1 conduction (block) and can only be reported as 2:1 AV block (Fig 3.12). Yet this is very commonly reported as
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