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How sleeping less than 6 hours affects your health After being awake for almost 14-16 hours, our body demands sleep. Minimum sleeping time required for a healthy mind and body is 7-8 hours. Although, this duration varies according to age. Because generally speaking, where a child can sleep for 12-14 hours, grownups can sleep for not more than 9 hours. Sound sleep is very essential otherwise, it can be harmful for our health. Let’s see how sleeping for less than 6 hours affects our health. Headache, weight gain and poor vision: When you sleep for less than 6 hours a day, it can not only give you headache all the time but can lead to a poor vision also. And if continued for a long time, may hamper your eyesight. The lesser you sleep the more weight you gain. And after-effects of gaining weight could be even more hazardous. Memory loss, heart disease, infection: Sleeplessness can have an adverse effect on one’s memory too. A person may find it difficult to remember even simple things. Also, infections can take a longer time to heal because sleep is something that stabilises and balances everything that goes wrong while we are awake. If we don’t get proper sleep, the process of healing takes longer. Lack of sleep can also elevate blood pressure which ultimately affects the heart. Urine overproduction, stammering and accident: Sleeping slows down urinating process but when you are awake for longer hours, you might have to urinate more than usual. Lack of sleep can also make you stammer while speaking. If lack of sleep continues, you may not be able to communicate properly. When you do not have sound sleep, your mental condition would not be stable because of declining concentration. You can be accident prone if you drive in such a condition. These are just a few of the ill effects. Sleeping for less than 5 hours is far more dangerous than you can even think. From behavioural to mental to physical effects, it can harm you in many more ways, So, have a sound sleep to avoid complications in life.
CARDIOLOGY DOCTORS IN HOSUR ROAD Pulmonary embolism This is not quite a cardiac condition and not quite a respiratory condition but it is often managed by cardiologists. Modern CT pulmonary angiography is very sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of PE. A negative scan that is of good quality effectively excludes the diagnosis. The scans are so sensitive that small distal emboli may be detected in patients who do not have convincing symptoms of embolism. This poses a therapeutic problem that may be avoided if scans are not ordered inappropriately. Some patients cannot have a CTPA, usually because of renal impairment that would make the injection of contrast risky. A V/Q nuclear scan is then a reasonable alternative to a CTPA. These scans are less accurate than CT pulmonary angiography but the clinical suspicion of PE and a lung scan reported as intermediate or high probability is an indication for treatment. Patients should be admitted to hospital and treatment begun with intravenous heparin or subcutaneous low molecular weight heparin. The latter has the advantage that the dose is determined by body weight and repeated measurements of clotting times are not required. In some cases it may be possible to treat patients with small pulmonary emboli at home with supervised low molecular weight heparin. Either way, soon after diagnosis patients should be started on oral anticoagulation treatment with warfarin. A stable INR may often be achieved within five days or so, the heparin ceased and the patient discharged. Most patients with dyspnoea as a result of PE begin to feel better within a few days of starting treatment. It is often difficult to know how long to continue treatment with warfarin. The usual recommendation for an uncomplicated first PE is three to six months. Recurrent PE may be an indication for lifelong treatment. It also suggests a need to investigate for clotting abnormalities (e.g. anti-thrombin III deficiency, protein S and protein C deficiency, abnormal Factor V and anti-nuclear antibody). A very large and life-threatening PE which is associated with the sudden onset of severe dyspnoea and hypotension may be an indication for thrombolytic treatment. An echocardiogram may show abnormal right ventricular function in these ill patients and help in the decision. Experience with this is limited and the optimum regimen is not really known. Tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) is now indicated for this purpose and current recommendations are for a 10 mg bolus over two minutes followed by 90 mg over two hours.
CCARDIOLOGIST IN DODDABOMMASANDRA, BANGALORE ardiac drugs A detailed drug history is essential. Ask about anti-anginal and anti-failure drugs. It is important to attempt to ensure that the patient gets these drugs on the day of the operation. This applies most of all to beta-blockers. Withdrawal of beta-blockers used for angina can precipitate unstable angina or an infarct. There is also evidence that the use of beta-blockers in the peri-operative period reduces the risk of significant ischaemic events.36 This is probably not the case for nitrates and calcium antagonists. Aspirin used for any patient with ischaemic heart disease should be stopped for the shortest possible period before surgery (about three days) . Warfarin, when used for protection against embolic events for atrial fibrillation, can usually be stopped four or five days pre-op and begun again soon afterwards. A possible exception is a patient with atrial fibrillation and a recent embolic event or a left atrial thrombus seen on echo. These patients may need to change to heparin, as detailed below. A history of infective endocarditis, known valvular heart disease (even if mild) or the presence of a prosthetic cardiac valve may be an indication for antibiotic prophylaxis. Patients with a prosthetic heart valve who are taking warfarin need careful management. If the valve is in the aortic position and it is a modern disc valve, it may be safe to allow the INR to fall moderately (to 1.8 or so) by the day of surgery and then to resume warfarin as soon as the patient can swallow. If the surgeon requires the INR to have fallen to normal or the patient has a valve in the mitral position, then cessation of warfarin and use of heparin is necessary. Normally the patient omits a warfarin dose and then is admitted to hospital three or four days before surgery. Intravenous heparin is begun and the APPT adjusted to 2 or 2.5 times normal. The heparin is stopped some hours before surgery and begun as soon afterwards as the surgeon allows. It is now possible, however, to use low molecular weight heparin instead
POPULAR CARDIOLOGIST IN AMRUTHA HALLI , BANGALORE Assessment of patients with hypertension A patient with definite or possible newly diagnosed hypertension needs at least a basic clinical assessment to look for possible aetiology, severity and signs of complications. The history Questioning should be directed towards the following areas. 1 Past history. Has hypertension been diagnosed before? What treatment was instituted? Why was it stopped? 2 Secondary causes. Important questions relate to: • a history of renal disease in the patient or his or her family, recurrent urinary tract infec-­ tions, heavy analgesic use or conditions leading to renal disease (e.g. systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)) • symptoms suggesting phaeochromocytoma (flushing, sweats, palpitations) • symptoms suggesting sleep apnoea • muscle weakness suggesting the hypokalaemia of hyperaldosteronism • Cushing’s syndrome (weight gain, skin changes) • family history of hypertension. 3 Aggravating factors: • high salt intake • high alcohol intake • lack of exercise • use of medications: NSAIDs, appetite suppressants, nasal decongestants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, ergotamine, cyclosporin, oestrogen-containing contraceptive pills • other: use of cocaine, liquorice, amphetamines. 4 Target organ damage: • stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) • angina, dyspnoea • fatigue, oliguria • visual disturbance • claudication. 5 Coexisting risk factors: • smoking • diabetes • lipid levels, if known
CARDIOLOGIST IN YELAHANKA SECOND DEGREE AV BLICK There are two basic types of second-degree AV block: AV nodal Möbitz type I (Wenckebach) heart block, and the more distal and more sinister Möbitz type II heart block. Möbitz type I heart block is much more common. In Möbitz type I block the PR interval lengthens progressively with each cardiac cycle, until an atrial wave is not conducted. There is recovery of conduction and the next a wave is conducted with a shorter interval and the cycle begins again. The QRS complex is narrow (Fig 3.10) (unless associated with pre-existing BBB). The increment is largest between the first and second conducted P wave, and the PR interval continues to increase by less and less until a P wave is dropped. Möbitz type II heart block is almost always associated with a BBB (Fig 3.11), since its origin is intraventricular (below the AV node), and it tends to lapse suddenly into extreme bradycardia or asystole. It tends to be over-diagnosed, especially in the setting of 2:1 AV block (Fig 3.12). There is no lengthening of the PR interval before an atrial wave is not conducted. At times, atropine or exercise can demonstrate the site of the block, by increasing the block from 2:1 to a higher grade when the underlying mechanism is Möbitz II. Conversely, Wenckebach conduction may improve to 3:2 or better. For a distinction to be made between Möbitz type I and Möbitz type II, at least two consecutively conducted P waves have to be evaluated. This is impossible in 2:1 conduction (block) and can only be reported as 2:1 AV block (Fig 3.12). Yet this is very commonly reported as
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