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How sleeping less than 6 hours affects your health After being awake for almost 14-16 hours, our body demands sleep. Minimum sleeping time required for a healthy mind and body is 7-8 hours. Although, this duration varies according to age. Because generally speaking, where a child can sleep for 12-14 hours, grownups can sleep for not more than 9 hours. Sound sleep is very essential otherwise, it can be harmful for our health. Let’s see how sleeping for less than 6 hours affects our health. Headache, weight gain and poor vision: When you sleep for less than 6 hours a day, it can not only give you headache all the time but can lead to a poor vision also. And if continued for a long time, may hamper your eyesight. The lesser you sleep the more weight you gain. And after-effects of gaining weight could be even more hazardous. Memory loss, heart disease, infection: Sleeplessness can have an adverse effect on one’s memory too. A person may find it difficult to remember even simple things. Also, infections can take a longer time to heal because sleep is something that stabilises and balances everything that goes wrong while we are awake. If we don’t get proper sleep, the process of healing takes longer. Lack of sleep can also elevate blood pressure which ultimately affects the heart. Urine overproduction, stammering and accident: Sleeping slows down urinating process but when you are awake for longer hours, you might have to urinate more than usual. Lack of sleep can also make you stammer while speaking. If lack of sleep continues, you may not be able to communicate properly. When you do not have sound sleep, your mental condition would not be stable because of declining concentration. You can be accident prone if you drive in such a condition. These are just a few of the ill effects. Sleeping for less than 5 hours is far more dangerous than you can even think. From behavioural to mental to physical effects, it can harm you in many more ways, So, have a sound sleep to avoid complications in life.
The use of invasive hemodynamic monitoring is based on the following principal factors: 1. Difficulty in interpreting clinical and radiographic findings of pulmonary congestion even after a thorough review of noninvasive studies such as an echo-cardiogram. 2. Need for identifying noncardiac causes of arterial hypotension, particularly hypovolemia. 3. Possible contribution of reduced ventricular compliance to impaired hemodynamics, requiring judicious adjustment of intravascular volume to optimize left ventricular filling pressure. 4. Difficulty in assessing the severity and sometimes even determining the presence of lesions such as mitral regurgitation and ventricular septal defect when the cardiac output or the systemic pressures are depressed. 5. Establishing a baseline of hemodynamic measurements and guiding therapy in patients with clinically apparent pulmonary edema or cardiogenic shock. 6. Underestimation of systemic arterial pressure by the cuff method in patients with intense vasoconstriction. The prognosis and the clinical status of patients with STEMI relate to both the cardiac output and the pulmonary artery wedge pressure. Patients
A risk factor is a demographic characteristic associated with an increased risk of ischaemic heart disease when other variables have been controlled. The presence of a risk factor in an individual increases his or her relative risk of a coronary event (angina, infarction or death). The absolute risk of a coronary event depends on the individual’s total number of risk factors and theirseverity (total risk). Important coronary risk factors are shown in Table 1.1. Risk assessment charts have been developed to estimate a patient’s cardiac risk over a number of years using easily identified risk factors. There are charts for different populations. The charts can be used to predict cardiovascular events or mortality (as in the NHF chart in Fig 1.1 on p. 4) or cardiac risk (systematic coronary risk evaluation system or SCORE charts). These charts can be very helpful in deciding when intervention to reduce risk is warranted; for example, when anti-hypertensive treatment should be commenced for a patient with mild blood pressure elevation. Risk factor reduction involves assessing the presence, severity and importance of risk factors for a
The causes of coronary symptoms The symptoms of coronary artery disease are caused by the reduction of myocardial perfusion that results from narrowing of the lumen of one or more of the coronary arteries. This narrowing is most often the result of atherosclerosis. Other much less common causes include: 1 coronary artery spasm (p. 146) (often in an already diseased segment of artery but sometimes as a result of the use of cocaine) 2 thrombosis (usually on an already diseased, or occasionally aneurismal, segment) 3 embolism (e.g. from an infected aortic valve) 4 congenital coronary abnormality
The causes of coronary symptoms The symptoms of coronary artery disease are caused by the reduction of myocardial perfusion that results from narrowing of the lumen of one or more of the coronary arteries. This narrowing is most often the result of atherosclerosis. Other much less common causes include: 1 coronary artery spasm (p. 146) (often in an already diseased segment of artery but sometimes as a result of the use of cocaine) 2 thrombosis (usually on an already diseased, or occasionally aneurismal, segment) 3 embolism (e.g. from an infected aortic valve) 4 congenital coronary abnormality HEART SPECIALIST IN YELAHANKA
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