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How sleeping less than 6 hours affects your health After being awake for almost 14-16 hours, our body demands sleep. Minimum sleeping time required for a healthy mind and body is 7-8 hours. Although, this duration varies according to age. Because generally speaking, where a child can sleep for 12-14 hours, grownups can sleep for not more than 9 hours. Sound sleep is very essential otherwise, it can be harmful for our health. Let’s see how sleeping for less than 6 hours affects our health. Headache, weight gain and poor vision: When you sleep for less than 6 hours a day, it can not only give you headache all the time but can lead to a poor vision also. And if continued for a long time, may hamper your eyesight. The lesser you sleep the more weight you gain. And after-effects of gaining weight could be even more hazardous. Memory loss, heart disease, infection: Sleeplessness can have an adverse effect on one’s memory too. A person may find it difficult to remember even simple things. Also, infections can take a longer time to heal because sleep is something that stabilises and balances everything that goes wrong while we are awake. If we don’t get proper sleep, the process of healing takes longer. Lack of sleep can also elevate blood pressure which ultimately affects the heart. Urine overproduction, stammering and accident: Sleeping slows down urinating process but when you are awake for longer hours, you might have to urinate more than usual. Lack of sleep can also make you stammer while speaking. If lack of sleep continues, you may not be able to communicate properly. When you do not have sound sleep, your mental condition would not be stable because of declining concentration. You can be accident prone if you drive in such a condition. These are just a few of the ill effects. Sleeping for less than 5 hours is far more dangerous than you can even think. From behavioural to mental to physical effects, it can harm you in many more ways, So, have a sound sleep to avoid complications in life.
THE BEST CARDIOLOGISTS IN GANGAMMA CIRCLE BANGALORE Thrombogenic factors Thrombosis is an important pathological process in coronary artery disease. Factors increasing the tendency to thrombosis include: n smoking n hypertriglyceridaemia n elevated fibrinogen (possibly) n oestrogen-containing contraceptive pills n polycythaemia n increased von Willebrand factor (a marker of endothelial dysfunction). The following factors are associated with reduced thrombotic tendency: n low-dose aspirin n other anti-platelet drugs (e.g. clopidogrel) n fish oils and mono-unsaturated fatty acids. Alcohol intake Alcohol intake has a complex relationship with coronary heart disease, with moderate intake being associated with decreased risk, and nil or heavy intake being associated with increased risk. Moderate intake is defined as 10–30 g per day for men; the optimal level for women is uncertain and alcohol may not have the same protective effect for women. Moderate alcohol intake is thought to be protective by: n increasing HDL levels n having anti-platelet activity n having an anti-oxidant effect—some components of alcoholic drinks, especially red wine and possibly beer. The evidence for the protective effect of alcohol is not strong and non-drinkers should never be urged to take up drinking. Hypertension and cerebrovascular disease increase in a linear fashion with alcohol intake, as do triglyceride levels. Therefore the beneficial effects of alcohol intake on coronary disease occur only at moderate intakes, and for those patients with hypertension, hypertriglyceridaemia or cerebrovascular disease, alcohol intake probably does not confer benefit.
HEART SPECIALISTS IN YELAHANKA NEW TOWN BANGALORE The causes of coronary symptoms The symptoms of coronary artery disease are caused by the reduction of myocardial perfusion that results from narrowing of the lumen of one or more of the coronary arteries. This narrowing is most often the result of atherosclerosis. Other much less common causes include: 1 coronary artery spasm (often in an already diseased segment of artery but sometimes as a result of the use of cocaine) 2 thrombosis (usually on an already diseased, or occasionally aneurismal, segment) 3 embolism (e.g. from an infected aortic valve) 4 congenital coronary abnormality 5 vasculitis. Numerous other cardiac symptoms and problems can be the eventual result of atheromatous coronary disease. These include myocardial infarction , cardiac failure cardiac arrhythmias and some cardiac valve problems. Risk factor mechanisms of action Atherosclerosis is thought to result primarily from a disturbance of the vascular endothelium. The final common pathway for the effects of endothelial dysfunction is largely through abnormalities of nitric oxide (NO) production. This chemical, released by a healthy endothelium, is a potent vasodilator and has anti-inflammatory and other favourable actions on the arteries. Causes of this disturbance can be: n mechanical (hypertension) n chemical (oxidised lipids, components of cigarette smoke, hyperinsulinaemia) or n due to immunological injury. The damaged endothelium attracts inflammatory mediators, platelets and circulating lipids and promotes fibroblast and smooth muscle proliferation. This results in the formation of a plaque, which may narrow the arterial lumen. Plaques can remain stable (or sometimes regress), enlarge, rupture or erode (more common in diabetics). Most acute ischaemic events (acute coronary syndromes or acute myocardial infarctions) are thought to be the result of further luminal narrowing caused by the formation of partly or fully occlusive thrombus on a ruptured or eroded plaque. Coronary risk factors may therefore operate because they are atherogenic or thrombogenic. Plaque rupture Plaque rupture may be at least partly an inflammatory process involving inflammatory cells, cytokines and even bacteria. This may explain the association between inflammatory markers such as high-sensitivity C reactive protein (hsCRP) and a risk of acute coronary events. Although this association seems well established, there is still uncertainty about its role in overall risk assessment Plaques at risk of rupture are called vulnerable plaques. They typically have a thin fibrous cap. The shoulde of these caps are at risk of rupturing and allowing material from within the plaque to come
CARDIOLOGISTS IN YELAHANKA Thrombogenic factors Thrombosis is an important pathological process in coronary artery disease. Factors increasing the tendency to thrombosis include: n smoking n hypertriglyceridaemia n elevated fibrinogen (possibly) n oestrogen-containing contraceptive pills n polycythaemia n increased von Willebrand factor (a marker of endothelial dysfunction). The following factors are associated with reduced thrombotic tendency: n low-dose aspirin n other anti-platelet drugs (e.g. clopidogrel) n fish oils and mono-unsaturated fatty acids.
THE BEST CARDIOLOGISTS IN YELAHANKA NEWTOWN BANGALORE Thrombogenic factors Thrombosis is an important pathological process in coronary artery disease. Factors increasing the tendency to thrombosis include: n smoking hypertriglyceridaemia elevated fibrinogen (possibly) oestrogen-containing contraceptive pills polycythaemia increased von Willebrand factor (a marker of endothelial dysfunction). The following factors are associated with reduced thrombotic tendency: low-dose aspirin nother anti-platelet drugs (e.g. clopidogrel) fish oils and mono-unsaturated fatty acids.
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