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DIABETIC DOCTORS IN MAHALAKSHMI LAY OUT BANGALORE. Diet and Nutrition A healthy diet for Nephrotic Syndrome patients consists of low salt, low fat and low cholesterol, with emphasis on fruits and vegetables. The amount of protein and fluid a patient with Nephrotic Syndrome should have depends on the patient’s current condition, age and weight. It is very important that a nephrologist be consuldieted. . . Healthy Diet: 1. Low sodium (salt) – helps with swelling in the hands and legs 2. Lots of fresh fruit and vegetables – fiber such as whole grains, fruits and vegetables can help lower total and LDL cholesterol 3. Low fat (1% or skim) dairy products Lean cuts of meat, less red meat, more chicken and fish SOMETIMES fluids should be restricted, as determined by a nephrologist.
DIABETIC DOCTORS NEAR ME Diabetes meal planning methods The diabetes plate method uses the image of a standard, 9-inch dinner plate as a way for individuals to plan their meals. In this approach, a plate is divided as follows: 50 percent non-starchy vegetables 25 percent protein 25 percent high-fiber carbohydrates Limited amounts of monounsaturated fats, such as olive and canola oils and avocado, and polyunsaturated fats, such as sesame seeds or nuts, can be used to prepare or accompany foods, such as fish or vegetables. Counting carbohydrates is another effective way to develop a healthful diabetes meal plan. This approach is used when people with diabetes have worked with a healthcare professional to determine how many carbohydrates they can safely eat each day, and the right amount to eat at each meal.
PAPULAR CARDIOLOGISTS IN HEBBALA ECG interpretation: points to remember 1 ECG reports should be short and based on clinical information where possible. 2 Check that the patient’s name is on the ECG and that the paper speed and calibration markers are correct. 3 Measure or estimate the heart rate—3 large squares = 100/minute. 4 Establish the rhythm. Look for P waves (best seen in L2). Are the P waves followed by QRS complexes? Look for anomalously conducted or ectopic beats. 5 Measure the intervals: PR, QRS duration and QT interval (for the latter, consult tables, but normal is less than 50% of the RR interval). 6 If the QRS complex is wide (> 3 small squares) consider the possibilities: LBBB, RBBB, WPW or ventricular rhythm or beats. If the pattern is of LBBB, there is no need in most cases to attempt further interpretation. 7 Estimate the QRS axis. In LAD, L1 and aVF diverge and L2 is predominantly negative. In RAD, L1 and aVF converge, while L2 matters little. Indeterminate axis is diagnosed when all six frontal leads are (more or less) equiphasic. 8 Check whether the criteria for LAHB or LAFB have been met. 9 Look for pathological Q waves. In general these are longer than 0.04 seconds and are more than 25% of the size of the following R wave.
best cardiologists in bangalore Murmurs Murmurs are produced by turbulent blood flow, and are described according to their location, intensity, timing, frequency, and radiation (Tables 15.1 to 15.3 and Figure 15.1). Innocent murmurs are due to pulmonary flow and can be heard in children, pregnancy, and high-flow states, such as hyperthyroidism and anaemia. They are heard over the left sternal edge and are ejection systolic, and there are no added sounds or thrill. The cervical venous hum is a continuous murmur, common in children and typically reduced by turning the head laterally or bending the elbows back. The mammary soufflé is a continuous murmur that may be heard in pregnancy. Dynamic auscultation manoeuvres may help bedside diagnosis of systolic murmurs (Table 15.2). 4, 5 Murmurs originating within the right-sided chambers of the heart can be differentiated from all other murmurs by augmentation of their intensity with inspiration and diminution with expiration. The murmur of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is distinguished from all other systolic murmurs by an increase in intensity with the Valsalva manoeuvre and during squatting-to-standing, and by a decrease in intensity during standing-to-squatting action, passive leg elevation, and handgrip. The murmurs of MR and VSD have similar responses but can be differentiated from other systolic murmurs by augmentation of their intensity with handgrip and during transient arterial occlusion.
Popular Cardiologist in yelahanka New Town, Bangalore • ECG interpretation: points to remember 1 ECG reports should be short and based on clinical information where possible. 2 Check that the patient’s name is on the ECG and that the paper speed and calibration markers are correct. 3 Measure or estimate the heart rate—3 large squares = 100/minute. 4 Establish the rhythm. Look for P waves (best seen in L2). Are the P waves followed by QRS complexes? Look for anomalously conducted or ectopic beats. 5 Measure the intervals: PR, QRS duration and QT interval (for the latter, consult tables, but normal is less than 50% of the RR interval). 6 If the QRS complex is wide (> 3 small squares) consider the possibilities: LBBB, RBBB, WPW or ventricular rhythm or beats. If the pattern is of LBBB, there is no need in most cases to attempt further interpretation. 7 Estimate the QRS axis. In LAD, L1 and aVF diverge and L2 is predominantly negative. In RAD, L1 and aVF converge, while L2 matters little. Indeterminate axis is diagnosed when all six frontal leads are (more or less) equiphasic. 8 Check whether the criteria for LAHB or LAFB have been met. 9 Look for pathological Q waves. In general these are longer than 0.04 seconds and are more than 25% of the size of the following R wave. 3• AN OVERVIEW OF CLINICAL ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHY 115 10 Increased QRS voltages suggest LVH if: • the height of the S wave in V1 added to the R wave in V5 or V6 is greater than 35 mm (SV1 + RV5 or RV6 > 35 mm) or • any R + S wave height in the V leads is greater than 45 mm or • the R wave in aVL (RaVL) is greater than 13 mm or • the R wave in L2 (R2) is greater than 15 mm. If the ST segment and T wave are affected, it is reported as LVH with ST/T changes or strain pattern. In RVH, the R wave is larger than the S wave in V1. 11 Look for ST depression or elevation. ST depression may reflect strain pattern rather than ischaemia, and ST elevation may be due to early repolarisation or pericarditis rather than infarction.
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