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THE BEST CARDIOLOGISTS IN YELAHANKA nvestigations of possible or probable stable angina Electrocardiography A standard 12-lead ECG should be obtained in all patients. This is likely to be normal in almost half of patients with subsequently proven coronary artery disease. Nevertheless, an abnormal trace lends weight to the symptoms and favours further investigation. Chest X-ray Routine radiology is not essential but may reveal important co-morbidities. It should always be performed in those with clinical evidence of hypertension, pericarditis (p. 174), heart failure or valvular disease, if only as a baseline. It is similarly indicated for patients with suspected or known pulmonary or systemic disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, COPD or alcoholism. Routine blood tests All patients with suspected angina should have the following routine investigations at presentation (NHF grade A recommendation): n fasting lipids, including total cholesterol, LDLs, HDLs and triglycerides—risk factors n fasting blood sugar—risk factor n full blood count—anaemia exacerbates angina n serum creatinine—impaired renal function is a risk factor and can be worsened by some cardiac investigations. If indicated clinically, thyroid function
THE BEST CARDIOLOGISTS NEAR HSR LAYOUT Coronary angiography (cardiac catheterisation) This procedure enables the cardiologist to visualise the coronary arteries . It is the standard against which other less-invasive investigations are assessed. Selective catheterisation of the right and left coronary ostia is performed. Contrast is then injected into the vessels and digital tape or disc storage of the images obtained. In most hospitals the patient is admitted on the morning of the test and allowed to go home that afternoon. The procedure is most often performed through the femoral artery (Judkins technique) . This artery can be punctured through the skin under local anaesthetic. A fine softtipped guide wire is then advanced into the artery and the needle withdrawn (Seldinger method). A short guiding sheath can then be placed over the wire and long cardiac catheters advanced through this sheath along a long guide wire into the femoral artery and up via the aorta to the aortic arch. The catheter and wire are advanced under X-ray control. Usually one catheter with a curved tip (pig-tail catheter; is advanced across the aortic valve into the left ventricle where left ventricular pressures are measured via a pressure transducer connected to the other end of the catheter. Measurement of the left ventricular end-diastolic pressure gives an indication of left ventricular function. Raised end-diastolic pressure (over 15 mmHg) suggests left ventricular dysfunction . The catheter is then connected to a pressure injector. This enables injection of a large volume of contrast over a few seconds; for example, 35 mL at 15 mL/second. X-ray recording during injection produces a left ventriculogram , Here left ventricular contraction can be assessed and the ejection fraction (percentage of end-diastolic volume ejected with each systole) estimated. The normal is 60% or more. The figure obtained by this method tends to be higher than that produced by the nuclear imaging method—gated blood pool scanning. The guide wire is reintroduced and the catheter withdrawn to be replaced by one shaped to fit into the right or left coronary orifice...
THE CARDIOLOGY CLINICS IN BANGALORE Important coronary risk factors 1 Existing vascular disease (coronary, cerebral or peripheral) 2 Age 3 Dyslipidaemia 4 Smoking 5 Family history 6 Hypertension 7 Male sex/hormonal factors 8 Diabetes 9 Renal impairment 10 Obesity 11 Inactivity 12 Thrombogenic factors 13 Other dietary factors 14 Homocystinaemia 15 Psychological factors 16 Elevated hsCRP 17 Abnormal CT calcium score/coronary angiogram 18 Left ventricular hypertrophy (hypertensive patients) 19 Abnormal
THE BEST CARDIOLOGISTS IN GANGAMMA CIRCLE BANGALORE Thrombogenic factors Thrombosis is an important pathological process in coronary artery disease. Factors increasing the tendency to thrombosis include: n smoking n hypertriglyceridaemia n elevated fibrinogen (possibly) n oestrogen-containing contraceptive pills n polycythaemia n increased von Willebrand factor (a marker of endothelial dysfunction). The following factors are associated with reduced thrombotic tendency: n low-dose aspirin n other anti-platelet drugs (e.g. clopidogrel) n fish oils and mono-unsaturated fatty acids. Alcohol intake Alcohol intake has a complex relationship with coronary heart disease, with moderate intake being associated with decreased risk, and nil or heavy intake being associated with increased risk. Moderate intake is defined as 10–30 g per day for men; the optimal level for women is uncertain and alcohol may not have the same protective effect for women. Moderate alcohol intake is thought to be protective by: n increasing HDL levels n having anti-platelet activity n having an anti-oxidant effect—some components of alcoholic drinks, especially red wine and possibly beer. The evidence for the protective effect of alcohol is not strong and non-drinkers should never be urged to take up drinking. Hypertension and cerebrovascular disease increase in a linear fashion with alcohol intake, as do triglyceride levels. Therefore the beneficial effects of alcohol intake on coronary disease occur only at moderate intakes, and for those patients with hypertension, hypertriglyceridaemia or cerebrovascular disease, alcohol intake probably does not confer benefit.
HEART SPECIALISTS IN HEBBALABANGALORE Case-based learning: cardiovascular risk assessment Mr RF is 60 years old and presents for a check-up because he is concerned he may be at risk of heart disease. Objectives for the group to understand How should this type of request be managed What can be done to assess an individual’s future cardiac risk, and what can be done to improve the prognosis for those at increased risk Epidemiology and population health The presenter should ask the group to consider the concept of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and the differences between population risk factors and those for an individual. How did the concept of risk factors arise Presenting symptoms and clinical examination What questions should be asked of Mr RF to begin the risk factor assessment 1 Is there a history of ischaemic heart disease or symptoms of heart disease 2 Has his cholesterol level been checked in the past What was itHas it been treated with diet or drugs, or both Has the level improved 3 Is he a diabetic, or has he had an abnormal blood sugar measurement 4 Is there a history of high blood pressure Has this been treated If so, how 5 Is there a history of heart disease in the familIf so, who has been affected and at what age 6 Does he smoke? How many cigarettes a day If he has ceased smoking, when did he stop 7 Does he exercise regularly 8 Have any cardiac investigations been performed before What were the results 9 Is there a history of peripheral arterial disease (claudication) or erectile dysfunction The group should appreciate that considerable information about risk can be obtained by asking simple questions. What physical examination should be performed
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