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HEART SPECIALISTS IN GANGAMMA CIRCLE BANGALORE Assessment of patients with hypertension A patient with definite or possible newly diagnosed hypertension needs at least a basic clinical assessment to look for possible aetiology, severity and signs of complications. The history Questioning should be directed towards the following areas. 1 Past history. Has hypertension been diagnosed before? What treatment was instituted? Why was it stopped? 2 Secondary causes. Important questions relate to: • a history of renal disease in the patient or his or her family, recurrent urinary tract infec-­ tions, heavy analgesic use or conditions leading to renal disease (e.g. systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)) • symptoms suggesting phaeochromocytoma (flushing, sweats, palpitations) • symptoms suggesting sleep apnoea • muscle weakness suggesting the hypokalaemia of hyperaldosteronism • Cushing’s syndrome (weight gain, skin changes) • family history of hypertension. 3 Aggravating factors: • high salt intake • high alcohol intake • lack of exercise • use of medications: NSAIDs, appetite suppressants, nasal decongestants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, ergotamine, cyclosporin, oestrogen-containing contraceptive pills • other: use of cocaine, liquorice, amphetamines. 4 Target organ damage: • stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) • angina, dyspnoea • fatigue, oliguria • visual disturbance • claudication. 5 Coexisting risk factors: • smoking • diabetes • lipid levels, if known • existing vascular disease • family history of ischaemic heart disease. 2• HYPERTENSION 6 Factors affecting choice of treatment: • diabetes (problems with thiazides and beta-blockers) • gout (problems with thiazides) • asthma (problems with beta-blockers) • heart failure (problems with verapamil, diltiazem, some beta-blockers, monoxidine) • severe peripheral arterial disease (problems with beta-blockers) • bradycardia or heart block (problems with beta-blockers, verapamil, diltiazem) • renovascular disease (problems with ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor antagonists (ARAs)) • problems with previous anti-hypertensive agents • allergies • likelihood of pregnancy (ACE inhibitors, diuretics and some calcium antagonists are contraindicated). The examination The physical examination should be undertaken with a view to establishing severity. 1 Measure the blood pressure. 2 Look for secondary causes. • Check the appearance for Cushing’s syndrome (central obesity, striae, muscle wasting), acromegaly, polycythaemia and uraemia. • Undertake abdominal palpation for renal masses (polycystic kidneys), occasionally adrenal mass, and auscultation for renal bruit (heard to the left or right of the mid-line above the umbilicus, often into the flanks). • Assess radiofemoral pulse delay and listen for mid
SAMIKSHA HEART AND DIABETIC CARE ''CONNECTIVE TISSUE DISORDERS'' ''Marfan Syndrome'' Marfan syndrome is a systemic connective tissue disorder with a frequency of 2 to 3 in 10, 000. The disorder is characterized by manifestations involving the cardiovascular, skeletal, and ocular systems. Current diagnostic criteria are based on involvement of above organ systems and family history. Cardiovascular manifestations include mitral valve prolapse, progressive aortic root enlargement, and ascending aortic aneurisms, possibly leading to aortic regurgitation, dissection, or rupture. Some characteristic skeletal manifestations of this syndrome include disproportional increase of linear bone growth resulting in malformations of the digits (arachnodactyly), craniofacial abnormalities, pectus excavatum/carinatum, and scoliosis. A common ocular involvement is severe myopia and lens dislocation in one or both eyes (ectopia lentis). Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by fibrillin-1 gene mutations encoding for the extracellular matrix protein fibrillin (Fbn-1). Fibrillin is an integral component of both elastic and nonelastic connective tissue. The mechanism of fibrillin mutation in Marfan syndrome remains unclear. However, animal models of Fbn-1 have demonstrated a role of TGF-beta signaling. In some patients with phenotypes similar to Marfan syndrome but without fibrillin- 1 gene mutations, TGF-beta receptor mutations have been identified, suggesting a significant role of TGF-beta pathway in the pathogenesis of Marfan syndrome features. Aortic root involvement remains the leading cause of death in patients with Marfan syndrome. Echocardiography is recommended to routinely screen and to follow aortic root dilation. In addition, all first-degree relatives of the family should have screening echocardiography. Patients should be advised against strenuous exercises. Medical therapy for Marfan syndrome includes beta-blockers to reduce myocardial contractility and pulse pressure. Animal models of Marfan syndrome have demonstrated a possible benefit of losartan in preventing progression of the disease by inhibiting the TGF-beta pathway, and this therapy is the subject of an active clinical trial. Elective aortic root replacement remains the therapy of choice once the aortic root becomes significantly enlarged. Marfan patients who become pregnant need to be counseled not only about the 50% chance of transmitting the disease but also the substantially increased risk of aortic rupture/dissection during and after pregnancy. Important components of Marfan syndrome counseling are consideration of contraception and pregnancy management. Loeys-Dietz Syndrome Recently, an aortic aneurysm syndrome has been identified with TGF-beta receptor mutations. Loeys-Dietz syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition with a characteristic triad of arterial tortuosity/aneurysm, hypertelorism, and bifid uvula or cleft palate. There is significant overlap with Marfan syndrome, and the management is similar in terms of cardiovascular manifestation. Early, elective, surgical intervention should be considered in patients with significant aneurysmal dilation of the aorta. Some clinicians have argued for much earlier surgical intervention for the dilated aorta in this condition, compared with Marfan syndrome, since there appears to be a much greater risk of rupture and dissection at earlier ages and smaller aortic sizes. Pregnancy counseling is also an integral part of therapy. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a group of disorders that affect connective tissue development due to defects in collagen and connective tissue biosynthesis. Prevalence of the disease is about 1 in 400, 000 people in the United States. Cardiac manifestations include spontaneous rupture of medium to large sized arteries including the aorta. Frequently, extracardiac presentations include hyperextensible skin and hypermobile joints. To date, 11 types of the disorder have been recognized, but collagen defects have been described in only 6 types. Although all types of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome affect the joints and the skin, clinical features vary by type. Different features characterize each type of the syndrome. Type IV carries the poorest prognosis, especially due to spontaneous ruptures of arteries and organs. Extreme caution needs to be taken if surgical intervention is needed due to weakened connective tissue structures. Many genes, including ADAMTS2, COL1A1, COL1A2, COL3A1, COL5A1, COL5A2, PLOD1, and TNXB, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Ehlers- Danlos syndrome, but the predominant cardiovascular concern exists in the Type IV vascular form of Ehlers-Danlos associated with mutations in the COL3A1 gene and aortic dilation/aneurysms. Other less commonly associated anomalies include ventricular septal defect, patent ductus arteriosus, bicuspid pulmonic valve, and Ebstein’s anomaly. Bicuspid aortic valve has been shown to demonstrate familial clustering. However, identifying culprit genes have been difficult due to variable penetrance and the common nature of the disorder.
POPULAR CARDIOLOGISTS IN SAHAKARANAGAR Cardiomyopathies and valvular heart disease Regardless of the status of the coronary arterial tree, both primary and secondary heart muscle disease can produce anginal pain through the imbalance of the oxygen demand and supply. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a relatively common cause of angina in the presence of normal coronary arteries. Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular cause of exertional chest tightness, which is probably due to myocardial ischaemia Exertional chest pain, which may be due to right ventricular angina, is a feature of pulmonary hypertension . Syndrome X There is some confusion regarding the ‘metabolic’ and ‘cardiac’ varieties. The former is a combination of insulin resistance, obesity, pro-inflammatory state and so on, leading to raised cardiovascular risk in the sufferers. The latter is, or should be, a form of stable effort angina that can be ascribed to coronary microvascular malfunction.23 The epicardial coronary tree is normal and the diagnosis is rather difficult to make except by exclusion. Acute coronary syndromes The terminology used to describe acute coronary syndromes (ACSs) continues to evolve as clinicians attempt to adjust to the accumulating evidence of the usefulness of modern cardiac markers and the treatment implications of different results. The most recent terminology is designed to help with treatment decisions based on the earliest clinical information from the patient. This comes from the history and the ECG. When the patient’s symptoms suggest an acute coronary syndrome, the first decisions about diagnosis and treatment are based on the ECG. If there is ST elevation present in a pattern to suggest myocardial infarction, the diagnosis is of ‘ST elevation myocardial infarction’ (STEMI). If there is no ST elevation, the initial diagnosis is of ‘non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome’ (NSTEACS).24 This elegant phrase has replaced ‘non-ST elevation myocardial infarction’ (non- STEMI). The reason is that the diagnosis of infarction cannot be made in the absence of ST elevation until cardiac marker estimations are available. The decisions about treatment, however, need to be made immediately and are based on symptoms and ECG changes.
POPULAR CARDIOLOGIST IN AMRUTHA HALLI , BANGALORE Assessment of patients with hypertension A patient with definite or possible newly diagnosed hypertension needs at least a basic clinical assessment to look for possible aetiology, severity and signs of complications. The history Questioning should be directed towards the following areas. 1 Past history. Has hypertension been diagnosed before? What treatment was instituted? Why was it stopped? 2 Secondary causes. Important questions relate to: • a history of renal disease in the patient or his or her family, recurrent urinary tract infec-­ tions, heavy analgesic use or conditions leading to renal disease (e.g. systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)) • symptoms suggesting phaeochromocytoma (flushing, sweats, palpitations) • symptoms suggesting sleep apnoea • muscle weakness suggesting the hypokalaemia of hyperaldosteronism • Cushing’s syndrome (weight gain, skin changes) • family history of hypertension. 3 Aggravating factors: • high salt intake • high alcohol intake • lack of exercise • use of medications: NSAIDs, appetite suppressants, nasal decongestants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, ergotamine, cyclosporin, oestrogen-containing contraceptive pills • other: use of cocaine, liquorice, amphetamines. 4 Target organ damage: • stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) • angina, dyspnoea • fatigue, oliguria • visual disturbance • claudication. 5 Coexisting risk factors: • smoking • diabetes • lipid levels, if known
ECHOCARDIOLOGIST IN GANGAMMA CIRCLE Mitral regurgitation A regurgitant mitral valve allows part of the left ventricular stroke volume to regurgitate into the left atrium, imposing a volume load on both the left atrium and the left ventricle. Symptoms: Dyspnoea (increased left atrial pressure); fatigue (decreased cardiac output). General signs: Tachypnoea. The pulse: Normal, or sharp upstroke due to rapid left ventricular decompression; atrial fibrillation is relatively common. Palpation: The apex beat may be displaced, diffuse and hyperdynamic if left ventricular enlargement has occurred; a pansystolic thrill may be present at the apex; a parasternal impulse (due to left atrial enlargement behind the right ventricle—the left atrium is often larger in mitral regurgitation than in mitral stenosis and can be enormous). All these signs suggest severe mitral regurgitation. Auscultation Soft or absent S1 (by the end of diastole, atrial and ventricular pressures have equalised and the valve cusps have drifted back together); left ventricular S3, due to rapid left ventricular filling in early diastole; pansystolic murmur maximal at the apex and usually radiating towards the axilla. Causes of chronic mitral regurgitation: (i) Degenerative; (ii) rheumatic; (iii) mitral valve prolapse; (iv) papillary muscle dysfunction, due to left ventricular failure or ischaemia.
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