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PAPULAR CARDIOLOGISTS IN HEBBALA ECG interpretation: points to remember 1 ECG reports should be short and based on clinical information where possible. 2 Check that the patient’s name is on the ECG and that the paper speed and calibration markers are correct. 3 Measure or estimate the heart rate—3 large squares = 100/minute. 4 Establish the rhythm. Look for P waves (best seen in L2). Are the P waves followed by QRS complexes? Look for anomalously conducted or ectopic beats. 5 Measure the intervals: PR, QRS duration and QT interval (for the latter, consult tables, but normal is less than 50% of the RR interval). 6 If the QRS complex is wide (> 3 small squares) consider the possibilities: LBBB, RBBB, WPW or ventricular rhythm or beats. If the pattern is of LBBB, there is no need in most cases to attempt further interpretation. 7 Estimate the QRS axis. In LAD, L1 and aVF diverge and L2 is predominantly negative. In RAD, L1 and aVF converge, while L2 matters little. Indeterminate axis is diagnosed when all six frontal leads are (more or less) equiphasic. 8 Check whether the criteria for LAHB or LAFB have been met. 9 Look for pathological Q waves. In general these are longer than 0.04 seconds and are more than 25% of the size of the following R wave.
POPULAR CARDIOLOGISTS IN SILK BOARD Atrial tachycardia with block Atrial tachycardia with block (paroxysmal atrial tachycardia (PAT) with block) is also an autonomous (automatic, ectopic) atrial tachycardia but its P waves are usually smaller (often discernible only in lead V1) and faster. As a result of this high rate, AV block—mostly 2:1, but often variable—is usually present prior to any exposure to drugs or vagal manoeuvres ). inthe past this was one of the classic manifestations of digoxin toxicity. It can be difficult to distinguish from other atrial rhythms such as AF, flutter and even sinus rhythm ..
THE CARDIOLOGISTS IN HSR LAYOUT Atrial fibrillation Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained arrhythmia. The atrial activity consists of chaotic, small fibrillatory f waves at 400–700/minute. The ventricular response is usually 130–160/minute and is irregular. The ventricular response rate is slower if the patient has been treated with anti-arrhythmic drugs or if there is intrinsic AV nodal disease. When the response rate is slow, the AF is often reported as ‘controlled’ . very rapid ventricular response—more than 200/minute—may be seen in the presence of a bypass tract, like the bundle of Kent in WPW syndrome (Fig 3.24) or James fibres in LGL syndrome . The AF itself should never be reported as ‘fast’ because it always
CARDIOLOGISTS IN DEVARABESANAHALLI BANGALORE Complex congenital heart disease: Fontan repair Anatomy and physiology Babies with a single ventricle or equivalent defect are often treated during childhood with a palliative operation to connect venous return directly to the pulmonary arteries—a Fontan repair. The prognosis is usually good: 75% of these patients survive at least 20 years. Complications Problems develop because of failure of the systemic ventricle, obstruction of the venous to pulmonary connection, atrial enlargement and AV valve regurgitation. Atrial arrhythmias become increasingly common. Sinus node dysfunction may necessitate pacing, which requires an epicardial electrode in most cases. Follow-up Echocardiography allows assessment of ventricular function and the AV valve. Obstruction in the Fontan connections can be examined with Doppler. MRI is increasingly useful for this assessment. Treatment Severe AV valve regurgitation, cyanosis and ventricular dysfunction are indications for intervention, including transplant or revision of the Fontan. Atrial arrhythmias can be treated with radiofrequency ablation. Pregnancy and contraception Pregnancy is possible in some patients with excellent Fontan function, good LV function and minimal AV valve regurgitation. Maternal risk is high if the Fontan is failing. There may be problems with the need to withdraw ACE inhibitors and with anticoagulation.
This ordinarily consists of monitoring of  is suspected. heart rate and rhythm,  repeated measurement of systemic arterial pressure by cuff,  obtaining chest radiographs to detect heart failure,  repeated auscultation of the lung fields for pulmonary congestion,  measurement of urine flow,  examination of the skin and mucous membranes for evidence of the adequacy of perfusion, and
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