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HEART SPECIALISTS IN HEBBALABANGALORE Case-based learning: cardiovascular risk assessment Mr RF is 60 years old and presents for a check-up because he is concerned he may be at risk of heart disease. Objectives for the group to understand How should this type of request be managed What can be done to assess an individual’s future cardiac risk, and what can be done to improve the prognosis for those at increased risk Epidemiology and population health The presenter should ask the group to consider the concept of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and the differences between population risk factors and those for an individual. How did the concept of risk factors arise Presenting symptoms and clinical examination What questions should be asked of Mr RF to begin the risk factor assessment 1 Is there a history of ischaemic heart disease or symptoms of heart disease 2 Has his cholesterol level been checked in the past What was itHas it been treated with diet or drugs, or both Has the level improved 3 Is he a diabetic, or has he had an abnormal blood sugar measurement 4 Is there a history of high blood pressure Has this been treated If so, how 5 Is there a history of heart disease in the familIf so, who has been affected and at what age 6 Does he smoke? How many cigarettes a day If he has ceased smoking, when did he stop 7 Does he exercise regularly 8 Have any cardiac investigations been performed before What were the results 9 Is there a history of peripheral arterial disease (claudication) or erectile dysfunction The group should appreciate that considerable information about risk can be obtained by asking simple questions. What physical examination should be performed
POPULAR CARDIOLOGIST IN AMRUTHA HALLI , BANGALORE Assessment of patients with hypertension A patient with definite or possible newly diagnosed hypertension needs at least a basic clinical assessment to look for possible aetiology, severity and signs of complications. The history Questioning should be directed towards the following areas. 1 Past history. Has hypertension been diagnosed before? What treatment was instituted? Why was it stopped? 2 Secondary causes. Important questions relate to: • a history of renal disease in the patient or his or her family, recurrent urinary tract infec-­ tions, heavy analgesic use or conditions leading to renal disease (e.g. systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)) • symptoms suggesting phaeochromocytoma (flushing, sweats, palpitations) • symptoms suggesting sleep apnoea • muscle weakness suggesting the hypokalaemia of hyperaldosteronism • Cushing’s syndrome (weight gain, skin changes) • family history of hypertension. 3 Aggravating factors: • high salt intake • high alcohol intake • lack of exercise • use of medications: NSAIDs, appetite suppressants, nasal decongestants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, ergotamine, cyclosporin, oestrogen-containing contraceptive pills • other: use of cocaine, liquorice, amphetamines. 4 Target organ damage: • stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) • angina, dyspnoea • fatigue, oliguria • visual disturbance • claudication. 5 Coexisting risk factors: • smoking • diabetes • lipid levels, if known
Types of Diabetes Learn about Diabetes You can learn how to take care of your diabetes and prevent some of the serious problems diabetes can cause. The more you know, the better you can manage your diabetes... Share this booklet with your family and friends so they will understand more about diabetes. Also make sure to ask your health care team any questions you might have.''
CARDIAC CENTERS IN YELAHANKA NEW TOWN BANGALORE ST segment There are two aspects to report: depression and elevation. Depression The ST segment is said to be abnormal if it slopes down 1 mm or more from the J point—the end of the QRS complex (downsloping depression)—or is depressed 1 mm or more horizontally (plane depression). Depression of the J point itself may be normal, especially during exercise, but this upsloping ST depression should return to the isoelectric line within 0.08 seconds. The isoelectric line is defined as the PR or TP segment of the ECG . ST depression may be due to ischaemia, the effect of digoxin, hypertrophy and so on. Elevation ST elevation of up to 3 mm may be normal in V leads (especially the right), and up to 1 mm may be normal in limb leads. This ST elevation is called early repolarisation syndrome or pattern. Otherwise ST elevation may mean an acute myocardial infarction where it is said to represent a current of injury. Pericarditis also causes ST elevation but unlike infarction is usually associated with concave upwards elevation. hypertrophy and conduction defects like LBBB can be associated with ST elevation in leads where the QRS is mostly negative. T waves The T wave is always inverted in lead aVR and often in L3 and V1–V2, and in aVL if the R wave is less than 5 mm tall. Inversion and flattening are common and non-specific findings. Deep (> 5 mm) symmetrical and persistent (days to weeks) inversion is consistent with infarction; broad, ‘giant’ inversion may follow syncope from any cause including cerebrovascular accidents. Like the ST segment, the T wave tends to be directed opposite to the main QRS deflection in conduction defects (e.g. LBBB), VEBs or ventricular hypertrophy (where it is described as secondary ST/T changes or strain pattern). Tall peaked T waves are most often seen as a reciprocal change to inferior or posterior infarcts. They are classically seen in patients with hyperkalaemia. Broader large T waves are seen in early (‘hyperacute’) infarction and sometimes in cerebrovascular accidents. While not diagnostic by themselves (T waves never are), when they are associated with modest ST elevation (especially in V3) and reciprocal depression in the inferior leads, they indicate infarction or ischaemia. When these changes evolve over time they are even more specific for infarction . A U wave may be prominent in patients with hypokalaemia, LVH and bradycardia. Isolated U inversion is a specific but insensitive sign of coronary disease. 54 PRACTICAL CARDIOLOGY ECG reports Reports should be short and stereotyped, with the description clearly separated from the comment. It is a good general strategy to under-report, especially for a beginner. It is generally wiser to state ‘inferior Q waves noted’ or ‘non-specific ST/T changes’ than to indulge in speculation on possible or probable infarction or ischaemia. ECG labels tend to have serious employment and insurance implications. On the other hand, specific questions on the request form must be addressed, since they constitute the reason for taking the ECG in the first place.
HEART SPECIALISTS IN GANGAMMA CIRCLE BANGALORE Assessment of patients with hypertension A patient with definite or possible newly diagnosed hypertension needs at least a basic clinical assessment to look for possible aetiology, severity and signs of complications. The history Questioning should be directed towards the following areas. 1 Past history. Has hypertension been diagnosed before? What treatment was instituted? Why was it stopped? 2 Secondary causes. Important questions relate to: • a history of renal disease in the patient or his or her family, recurrent urinary tract infec-­ tions, heavy analgesic use or conditions leading to renal disease (e.g. systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)) • symptoms suggesting phaeochromocytoma (flushing, sweats, palpitations) • symptoms suggesting sleep apnoea • muscle weakness suggesting the hypokalaemia of hyperaldosteronism • Cushing’s syndrome (weight gain, skin changes) • family history of hypertension. 3 Aggravating factors: • high salt intake • high alcohol intake • lack of exercise • use of medications: NSAIDs, appetite suppressants, nasal decongestants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, ergotamine, cyclosporin, oestrogen-containing contraceptive pills • other: use of cocaine, liquorice, amphetamines. 4 Target organ damage: • stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) • angina, dyspnoea • fatigue, oliguria • visual disturbance • claudication. 5 Coexisting risk factors: • smoking • diabetes • lipid levels, if known • existing vascular disease • family history of ischaemic heart disease. 2• HYPERTENSION 6 Factors affecting choice of treatment: • diabetes (problems with thiazides and beta-blockers) • gout (problems with thiazides) • asthma (problems with beta-blockers) • heart failure (problems with verapamil, diltiazem, some beta-blockers, monoxidine) • severe peripheral arterial disease (problems with beta-blockers) • bradycardia or heart block (problems with beta-blockers, verapamil, diltiazem) • renovascular disease (problems with ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor antagonists (ARAs)) • problems with previous anti-hypertensive agents • allergies • likelihood of pregnancy (ACE inhibitors, diuretics and some calcium antagonists are contraindicated). The examination The physical examination should be undertaken with a view to establishing severity. 1 Measure the blood pressure. 2 Look for secondary causes. • Check the appearance for Cushing’s syndrome (central obesity, striae, muscle wasting), acromegaly, polycythaemia and uraemia. • Undertake abdominal palpation for renal masses (polycystic kidneys), occasionally adrenal mass, and auscultation for renal bruit (heard to the left or right of the mid-line above the umbilicus, often into the flanks). • Assess radiofemoral pulse delay and listen for mid
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