http://WWW.HEARTDIABETESCARE.COM
SAMIKSHAHEARTCARE 57698d5b9ec66b0b6cfb5b6b False 575 1
OK
background image not found
Found Update results for
'pulmonary artery wedge'
9
The use of invasive hemodynamic monitoring is based on the following principal factors: 1. Difficulty in interpreting clinical and radiographic findings of pulmonary congestion even after a thorough review of noninvasive studies such as an echo-cardiogram. 2. Need for identifying noncardiac causes of arterial hypotension, particularly hypovolemia. 3. Possible contribution of reduced ventricular compliance to impaired hemodynamics, requiring judicious adjustment of intravascular volume to optimize left ventricular filling pressure. 4. Difficulty in assessing the severity and sometimes even determining the presence of lesions such as mitral regurgitation and ventricular septal defect when the cardiac output or the systemic pressures are depressed. 5. Establishing a baseline of hemodynamic measurements and guiding therapy in patients with clinically apparent pulmonary edema or cardiogenic shock. 6. Underestimation of systemic arterial pressure by the cuff method in patients with intense vasoconstriction. The prognosis and the clinical status of patients with STEMI relate to both the cardiac output and the pulmonary artery wedge pressure. Patients
The causes of coronary symptoms The symptoms of coronary artery disease are caused by the reduction of myocardial perfusion that results from narrowing of the lumen of one or more of the coronary arteries. This narrowing is most often the result of atherosclerosis. Other much less common causes include: 1 coronary artery spasm (p. 146) (often in an already diseased segment of artery but sometimes as a result of the use of cocaine) 2 thrombosis (usually on an already diseased, or occasionally aneurismal, segment) 3 embolism (e.g. from an infected aortic valve) 4 congenital coronary abnormality
The causes of coronary symptoms The symptoms of coronary artery disease are caused by the reduction of myocardial perfusion that results from narrowing of the lumen of one or more of the coronary arteries. This narrowing is most often the result of atherosclerosis. Other much less common causes include: 1 coronary artery spasm (p. 146) (often in an already diseased segment of artery but sometimes as a result of the use of cocaine) 2 thrombosis (usually on an already diseased, or occasionally aneurismal, segment) 3 embolism (e.g. from an infected aortic valve) 4 congenital coronary abnormality HEART SPECIALIST IN YELAHANKA
CARDIOLOGIST IN SAHAKARANAGAR The causes of coronary symptoms The symptoms of coronary artery disease are caused by the reduction of myocardial perfusion that results from narrowing of the lumen of one or more of the coronary arteries. This narrowing is most often the result of atherosclerosis. Other much less common causes include: 1 coronary artery spasm (p. 146) (often in an already diseased segment of artery but sometimes as a result of the use of cocaine) 2 thrombosis (usually on an already diseased, or occasionally aneurismal, segment) 3 embolism (e.g. from an infected aortic valve) 4 congenital coronary abnormality 5 vasculitis.
It may also improve arterial oxygenation by reducing pulmonary vascular congestion DIURETICS. Mild heart failure responds well to diuretics such as furosemide, Dose - 10 to 40 mg, repeated at 3- to 4-hour intervals if necessary. It reduces pulmonary capillary pressure reduces dyspnea. Decreased LVDV↓ LV wall tension - ↓ myocardial oxygen requirements and may lead to improvement of contractility and augmentation of the ejection fraction, stroke volume, and cardiac output. The reduction of elevated left ventricular filling pressure may also enhance myocardial oxygen delivery by diminishing the impedance to coronary perfusion attributable to elevated ventricular wall tension. .
Left Ventricular Failure Single most important predictor of mortality following STEMI in patients with STEMI Systolic dysfunction alone or both systolic and diastolic dysfunction can occur. LVDD leads to pulmonary venous hypertension and pulmonary congestion. Systolic dysfunction - ↓ cardiac output and of the ejection fraction. Predictors of LVF infarct size, advanced age and diabetes.[190] Mortality increases in association with the severity of the hemodynamic deficit.
THE BEST CARDIOLOGISTS IN YELAHANKA nvestigations of possible or probable stable angina Electrocardiography A standard 12-lead ECG should be obtained in all patients. This is likely to be normal in almost half of patients with subsequently proven coronary artery disease. Nevertheless, an abnormal trace lends weight to the symptoms and favours further investigation. Chest X-ray Routine radiology is not essential but may reveal important co-morbidities. It should always be performed in those with clinical evidence of hypertension, pericarditis (p. 174), heart failure or valvular disease, if only as a baseline. It is similarly indicated for patients with suspected or known pulmonary or systemic disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, COPD or alcoholism. Routine blood tests All patients with suspected angina should have the following routine investigations at presentation (NHF grade A recommendation): n fasting lipids, including total cholesterol, LDLs, HDLs and triglycerides—risk factors n fasting blood sugar—risk factor n full blood count—anaemia exacerbates angina n serum creatinine—impaired renal function is a risk factor and can be worsened by some cardiac investigations. If indicated clinically, thyroid function
THE BEST CARDIOLOGISTS IN YELAHANKA Indications for coronary angiography 1 Angina not responding to medical treatment in a patient without contraindications (e.g. extreme old age—usually older than about 85 these days—or severe co-morbidities) to cardiac surgery or angioplasty. 2 Continuing chest pain whose cause is not clear despite non-invasive investigations. The procedure may well be worthwhile if it reveals normal coronary arteries and prevents a patient being treated unnecessarily with more and more anti-anginal drugs. Non-invasive investigations are more often equivocal in women, and more women than men are found to have normal coronaries at angiography. 3 Preparation of a patient older than 35 or so for some other cardiac surgery (e.g. valve replacement). The surgeon needs to know whether significant coronary disease is present so that coronary grafting can be performed at the time of valve surgery. Otherwise, patients are at risk of ischaemic problems in the post-operative period. 4 Diagnosis of cardiomyopathy (p. 267) by excluding coronary artery disease and infarction as the cause of angina or cardiac failure. These patients may benefit from revascularisation if significant coronary disease is also present (‘ischaemic cardiomyopathy’). 5 Investigation of patients following myocardial infarction. Routine transfer to a centre with angiographic facilities after successful thrombolytic treatment is a grade D recommendation. There is no proof that a patient without continuing ischaemia has an improved prognosis when angiography and revascularisation are carried out routinely after infarction. The Open Artery Trial results suggest there is no benefit compared with optimal medical treatment for patients without ischaemic symptoms in having an occluded vessel opened five days or more after an infarction. However, spontaneous or induced ischaemia (by modified stress testing or perfusion imaging) leads to a grade B recommendation for angiography and intervention. The management of post-infarct patients is definitely easier if the coronary anatomy is known, and many units adopt the policy of early (within a week) angiography of infarct patients without contraindications to revascularisation. 6 Non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes (p. 156). 7 Acute myocardial infarction in a unit where primary angioplasty can be performed
This ordinarily consists of monitoring of  is suspected. heart rate and rhythm,  repeated measurement of systemic arterial pressure by cuff,  obtaining chest radiographs to detect heart failure,  repeated auscultation of the lung fields for pulmonary congestion,  measurement of urine flow,  examination of the skin and mucous membranes for evidence of the adequacy of perfusion, and
1
false