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How sleeping less than 6 hours affects your health After being awake for almost 14-16 hours, our body demands sleep. Minimum sleeping time required for a healthy mind and body is 7-8 hours. Although, this duration varies according to age. Because generally speaking, where a child can sleep for 12-14 hours, grownups can sleep for not more than 9 hours. Sound sleep is very essential otherwise, it can be harmful for our health. Let’s see how sleeping for less than 6 hours affects our health. Headache, weight gain and poor vision: When you sleep for less than 6 hours a day, it can not only give you headache all the time but can lead to a poor vision also. And if continued for a long time, may hamper your eyesight. The lesser you sleep the more weight you gain. And after-effects of gaining weight could be even more hazardous. Memory loss, heart disease, infection: Sleeplessness can have an adverse effect on one’s memory too. A person may find it difficult to remember even simple things. Also, infections can take a longer time to heal because sleep is something that stabilises and balances everything that goes wrong while we are awake. If we don’t get proper sleep, the process of healing takes longer. Lack of sleep can also elevate blood pressure which ultimately affects the heart. Urine overproduction, stammering and accident: Sleeping slows down urinating process but when you are awake for longer hours, you might have to urinate more than usual. Lack of sleep can also make you stammer while speaking. If lack of sleep continues, you may not be able to communicate properly. When you do not have sound sleep, your mental condition would not be stable because of declining concentration. You can be accident prone if you drive in such a condition. These are just a few of the ill effects. Sleeping for less than 5 hours is far more dangerous than you can even think. From behavioural to mental to physical effects, it can harm you in many more ways, So, have a sound sleep to avoid complications in life.
POPULAR CARDIOLOGIST IN AMRUTHA HALLI , BANGALORE Assessment of patients with hypertension A patient with definite or possible newly diagnosed hypertension needs at least a basic clinical assessment to look for possible aetiology, severity and signs of complications. The history Questioning should be directed towards the following areas. 1 Past history. Has hypertension been diagnosed before? What treatment was instituted? Why was it stopped? 2 Secondary causes. Important questions relate to: • a history of renal disease in the patient or his or her family, recurrent urinary tract infec-­ tions, heavy analgesic use or conditions leading to renal disease (e.g. systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)) • symptoms suggesting phaeochromocytoma (flushing, sweats, palpitations) • symptoms suggesting sleep apnoea • muscle weakness suggesting the hypokalaemia of hyperaldosteronism • Cushing’s syndrome (weight gain, skin changes) • family history of hypertension. 3 Aggravating factors: • high salt intake • high alcohol intake • lack of exercise • use of medications: NSAIDs, appetite suppressants, nasal decongestants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, ergotamine, cyclosporin, oestrogen-containing contraceptive pills • other: use of cocaine, liquorice, amphetamines. 4 Target organ damage: • stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) • angina, dyspnoea • fatigue, oliguria • visual disturbance • claudication. 5 Coexisting risk factors: • smoking • diabetes • lipid levels, if known
HEART SPECIALISTS IN GANGAMMA CIRCLE BANGALORE Assessment of patients with hypertension A patient with definite or possible newly diagnosed hypertension needs at least a basic clinical assessment to look for possible aetiology, severity and signs of complications. The history Questioning should be directed towards the following areas. 1 Past history. Has hypertension been diagnosed before? What treatment was instituted? Why was it stopped? 2 Secondary causes. Important questions relate to: • a history of renal disease in the patient or his or her family, recurrent urinary tract infec-­ tions, heavy analgesic use or conditions leading to renal disease (e.g. systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)) • symptoms suggesting phaeochromocytoma (flushing, sweats, palpitations) • symptoms suggesting sleep apnoea • muscle weakness suggesting the hypokalaemia of hyperaldosteronism • Cushing’s syndrome (weight gain, skin changes) • family history of hypertension. 3 Aggravating factors: • high salt intake • high alcohol intake • lack of exercise • use of medications: NSAIDs, appetite suppressants, nasal decongestants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, ergotamine, cyclosporin, oestrogen-containing contraceptive pills • other: use of cocaine, liquorice, amphetamines. 4 Target organ damage: • stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) • angina, dyspnoea • fatigue, oliguria • visual disturbance • claudication. 5 Coexisting risk factors: • smoking • diabetes • lipid levels, if known • existing vascular disease • family history of ischaemic heart disease. 2• HYPERTENSION 6 Factors affecting choice of treatment: • diabetes (problems with thiazides and beta-blockers) • gout (problems with thiazides) • asthma (problems with beta-blockers) • heart failure (problems with verapamil, diltiazem, some beta-blockers, monoxidine) • severe peripheral arterial disease (problems with beta-blockers) • bradycardia or heart block (problems with beta-blockers, verapamil, diltiazem) • renovascular disease (problems with ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor antagonists (ARAs)) • problems with previous anti-hypertensive agents • allergies • likelihood of pregnancy (ACE inhibitors, diuretics and some calcium antagonists are contraindicated). The examination The physical examination should be undertaken with a view to establishing severity. 1 Measure the blood pressure. 2 Look for secondary causes. • Check the appearance for Cushing’s syndrome (central obesity, striae, muscle wasting), acromegaly, polycythaemia and uraemia. • Undertake abdominal palpation for renal masses (polycystic kidneys), occasionally adrenal mass, and auscultation for renal bruit (heard to the left or right of the mid-line above the umbilicus, often into the flanks). • Assess radiofemoral pulse delay and listen for mid
samiksha heart and diabetic care new town yelahanka banglore The Evaluation of the Cause of Heart Failure: The History History to include inquiry regarding: Hypertension Diabetes Dyslipidemia Valvular heart disease Coronary or peripheral vascular disease Myopathy Rheumatic fever Mediastinal irradiation History or symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing Exposure to cardiotoxic agents Current and past alcohol consumption Smoking Collagen vascular disease Exposure to sexually transmitted diseases Thyroid disorder Pheochromocytoma Obesity Family history to include inquiry regarding: Predisposition to atherosclerotic disease (Hx of MIs, strokes, PAD) Sudden cardiac death Myopathy Conduction system disease (need for pacemaker) Tachyarrhythmias Cardiomyopathy (unexplained HF) Skeletal myopathies
samiksha heart and diabetic care new town yelahanka banglore The Evaluation of the Cause of Heart Failure: The History History to include inquiry regarding: Hypertension Diabetes Dyslipidemia Valvular heart disease Coronary or peripheral vascular disease Myopathy Rheumatic fever Mediastinal irradiation History or symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing Exposure to cardiotoxic agents Current and past alcohol consumption Smoking Collagen vascular disease Exposure to sexually transmitted diseases Thyroid disorder Pheochromocytoma Obesity Family history to include inquiry regarding: Predisposition to atherosclerotic disease (Hx of MIs, strokes, PAD) Sudden cardiac death Myopathy Conduction system disease (need for pacemaker) Tachyarrhythmias Cardiomyopathy (unexplained HF) Skeletal myopathies
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