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BEST DIABETOLOGISTS IN HEBBALA BANGALORE Diabetes Type 1 and type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) are associated with an increased risk of coronary disease, peripheral vascular disease and cerebrovascular disease.21 Diabetics have a two- to threefold risk of coronary disease at all ages and those with IGT have a 1.5-fold risk. Diabetes is a stronger risk factor for women (3.3 times) than for men (1.9 times). The excess risk for type 1 patients is largely confined to those with diabetic renal disease. All type 2 patients are at increased risk.22 Diabetes is thought to increase coronary heart disease because: n increased insulin levels result in increased hepatic synthesis of LDL and triglycerides, causing a mixed dyslipidaemia n insulin resistance, which is characteristic of type 2 diabetes, is associated with numerous other cardiovascular risk factors: dyslipidaemia, hypertension, endothelial dysfunction and microalbuminuria n hyperglycaemia itself may cause endothelial damage n glycosylated LDL may be more atherogenic than non-glycosylated LDL. Table 1.12 Glucose tolerance, current WHO definitions (venous plasma glucose) Fasting glucose 2-hour post-glucose load (mmol/L) Normal glucose regulation < 6.0 < 7.8 Impaired fasting glucose 6.1–6.9 < 7.8 Impaired glucose tolerance < 7.0 7.8–11.0 Diabetes > 7.0 > 11.1 16 PRACTICAL CARDIOLOGY Glycaemic control The UKPDS Trial has shown a very significant reduction in the microvascular complications of diabetes with improved glycaemic control but the improvement in macrovascular complications did not quite reach significance. Nevertheless, the UKPDS trialists estimate that each 1% reduction in HbA1c leads to a 14% reduction in cardiovascular risk. Diabetics tend to have more diffuse coronary disease. shows a diffusely diseased right coronary artery from a type 2 diabetic patient before and after coronary stenting . Coronary artery surgery involves a higher risk for diabetics, and graft disease and progression of native disease occur earlier in these patients. Nevertheless, diabetics probably have a better prognosis after surgical revascularisation than after angioplasty because of their higher risk of restenosis following angioplastY
THE BEST CARDIOLOGISTS IN YELAHANKA nvestigations of possible or probable stable angina Electrocardiography A standard 12-lead ECG should be obtained in all patients. This is likely to be normal in almost half of patients with subsequently proven coronary artery disease. Nevertheless, an abnormal trace lends weight to the symptoms and favours further investigation. Chest X-ray Routine radiology is not essential but may reveal important co-morbidities. It should always be performed in those with clinical evidence of hypertension, pericarditis (p. 174), heart failure or valvular disease, if only as a baseline. It is similarly indicated for patients with suspected or known pulmonary or systemic disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, COPD or alcoholism. Routine blood tests All patients with suspected angina should have the following routine investigations at presentation (NHF grade A recommendation): n fasting lipids, including total cholesterol, LDLs, HDLs and triglycerides—risk factors n fasting blood sugar—risk factor n full blood count—anaemia exacerbates angina n serum creatinine—impaired renal function is a risk factor and can be worsened by some cardiac investigations. If indicated clinically, thyroid function
THE CARDIOLOGISTS IN HSR LAYOUT Atrial fibrillation Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained arrhythmia. The atrial activity consists of chaotic, small fibrillatory f waves at 400–700/minute. The ventricular response is usually 130–160/minute and is irregular. The ventricular response rate is slower if the patient has been treated with anti-arrhythmic drugs or if there is intrinsic AV nodal disease. When the response rate is slow, the AF is often reported as ‘controlled’ . very rapid ventricular response—more than 200/minute—may be seen in the presence of a bypass tract, like the bundle of Kent in WPW syndrome (Fig 3.24) or James fibres in LGL syndrome . The AF itself should never be reported as ‘fast’ because it always
POPULAR CARDIOLOGIST IN KATTIGENAHALLI, BANGALORE Cyanotic congenital heart disease Some of the more common cyanotic lesions are discussed below. There are, however, a number of problems common to patients with cyanotic heart disease. 1 Erythrocytosis. Chronic cyanosis causes an increase in red cell numbers as a way of increasing oxygen carrying capacity. The platelet count is sometimes reduced and the white cell count normal. The increased blood viscosity associated with the high red cell mass causes a slight increase in the risk of stroke.37 Most patients have a stable elevated haemoglobin level, but venesection is recommended if this is greater than 20 g/dL and the haematocrit is greater than 65%. Levels as high as this can be associated with the hyperviscosity syndrome: headache, fatigue and difficulty concentrating. Recurrent venesection can cause iron depletion and the production of microcytic red cells, which are stiffer than normal cells and so increase viscosity further. 2 Bleeding. Reduced platelet numbers, abnormal platelet function and clotting factor deficiencies mean these patients have an increased risk of haemorrhage. The most dangerous problem is pulmonary haemorrhage but bleeding from the gums and menorrhagia are more common. The use of anticoagulation must be restricted to those with a strong indication for treatment. 3 Gallstones. Chronic cyanosis and increased haem turnover are associated with an increased incidence of pigment gallstones. 4 Renal dysfunction and gout. Congestion of the renal glomeruli is associated with a reduced glomerular filtration rate and proteinuria. This and the increased turnover of red cells lead to urate accumulation and gout. 5 Pulmonary hypertension. Lesions associated with increased flow through the pulmonary circulation (e.g. a large atrial septal defect) can lead to a reactive rise in pulmonary arterial resistance. This is more likely to occur if the left to right shunt is large. Eventually these pulmonary vascular changes become irreversible, pulmonary pressures equal or exceed systemic pressures, and central cyanosis occurs because the intra-cardiac shunt reverses (Eisenmenger’s syndrome). Flow is now from right to left. There is then no benefit in attempting to correct the underlying cardiac abnormality. Earlier and more successful treatment of children with congenital heart disease has reduced the number of patients with this inexorable disease. Careful management of these conditions can nevertheless improve patients’ symptoms and survival. Reasonable exercise tolerance is usually maintained into adult life for most patients but progressive deterioration then occurs. Haemorrhagic complications, especially haemoptysis, are common. Thrombotic stroke, cerebral abscess and pulmonary infarction can also occur.
HEART DOCTORS IN YELAHANKA NEWTOWN, BANGALORE Management of ACS (NSTEACS) Patients with this diagnosis represent a rather heterogeneous group. Some have had the recent onset of angina at the extremes of exercise, others have angina at rest associated with ECG changes. This variation has made attempts to study the effects of different treatment rather difficult. Although the majority of patients with myocardial infarction have a preceding period of unstable angina, only about 5% of all patients admitted to hospital with a diagnosis of an ACS go on to infarct during that admission. The in-hospital mortality for these patients is low. Mortality rates of less than 2% are usual. Nevertheless, there is a real short-term and longerterm risk of infarction, recurrent admission with unstable symptoms and death which is higher than that of patients with stable angina. The diagnosis should therefore lead to admission to a CCU. The cardiac enzymes are, by definition, not elevated in these patients but the newer, more sensitive tests for troponin T and troponin I may be abnormal and indicate a worse prognosis . In the CCU, bed rest, oxygen and ECG monitoring are routinely enforced and any mobile phones taken away (allegedly to protect the monitoring equipment). Recurrence of chest pain can be assessed quickly and ECGs performed to look for changes suggesting infarction. The cardiac biomarkers can be checked regularly. All patients should receive aspirin (300 mg) unless there is a contraindication. Patients with an intermediate or a higher risk should also be given clopidogrel (usually a 300–600 mg loading dose). The use of intravenous heparin has become standard treatment. A typical starting dose is 5000 units as a bolus followed by 24, 000 units over 24 hours. The activated partial thromboplastin time (APPT) should be measured after about six hours of treatment and the infusion rate of heparin adjusted to maintain this at about twice normal. Heparin is generally safe when used in this way. Bleeding problems may sometimes occur and the platelet count should be checked every few days so that heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HITS), a rare but serious complication, can be detected early. Low molecular weight heparins are at least as effective as unfractionated heparin. These drugs have some advantages over heparin. Their dose response effect is more predictable and they cause less thrombocytopenia. They are effective given subcutaneously without APPT monitoring and are now cheaper than IV heparin when savings on APPT monitoring and the use of infusion sets are considered. A standard twice-daily dose is given according to the patient’s weight—1 mg/kg for enoxaparin (Clexane). The dose is reduced by half for those with moderate or severe renal impairment and for those over the age of 75. Additional treatment should include beta-blockers unless these are contraindicated. These drugs reduce the number of ischaemic episodes and probably the risk of myocardial infarction. Nitrates can be a useful adjunctive treatment. They may be given orally, topically or intravenously. The IV dose can be titrated up or down depending on the amount of pain the patient is experiencing and the severity of side effects such as hypotension and headache. The problem of tachyphylaxis with nitrates can be overcome by steady increases in the IV dose if necessary. Calcium antagonists are appropriate treatment for patients intolerant of beta-blockers and may sometimes be added to beta-blockers. Nifedipine, especially in its short-acting form, should not be used for patients with acute coronary syndromes unless they are already taking beta-blockers. Thrombolytic drugs have been disappointing when used for NSTEACS. In trials where they have been used for patients with ischaemic chest pain but without ST elevation there has been a trend towards an adverse outcome. This may be related to the rebound hypercoagulable state that can occur after their use. In general they should not be used for the treatment of NSTEACS. Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors (p. 198) should be given for high-risk patients,
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