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THE BEST CARDIOLOGISTS IN YELAHANKA A systematic description of ECGs The following eight short steps will enable most ECGs to be described correctly: 1 Check the paper speed and calibration markers. 2 Measure or estimate the heart rate. 3 Estimate the rhythm. 4 Look for P waves. 5 Measure the PR interval. 6 Examine the QRS complex. 7 Check the ST segment. 8 Measure the T wave. ECG interpretation should always be as restrained as practicable, taking into account the clinical context where known and comparison with previous tracings where possible. The possibility of Prinzmetal’s electrocardiographic heart disease must always be borne in mind—that is, do not assume that an abnormal ECG always means heart disease.2.
This ordinarily consists of monitoring of  is suspected. heart rate and rhythm,  repeated measurement of systemic arterial pressure by cuff,  obtaining chest radiographs to detect heart failure,  repeated auscultation of the lung fields for pulmonary congestion,  measurement of urine flow,  examination of the skin and mucous membranes for evidence of the adequacy of perfusion, and
PAPULAR CARDIOLOGISTS IN HEBBALA ECG interpretation: points to remember 1 ECG reports should be short and based on clinical information where possible. 2 Check that the patient’s name is on the ECG and that the paper speed and calibration markers are correct. 3 Measure or estimate the heart rate—3 large squares = 100/minute. 4 Establish the rhythm. Look for P waves (best seen in L2). Are the P waves followed by QRS complexes? Look for anomalously conducted or ectopic beats. 5 Measure the intervals: PR, QRS duration and QT interval (for the latter, consult tables, but normal is less than 50% of the RR interval). 6 If the QRS complex is wide (> 3 small squares) consider the possibilities: LBBB, RBBB, WPW or ventricular rhythm or beats. If the pattern is of LBBB, there is no need in most cases to attempt further interpretation. 7 Estimate the QRS axis. In LAD, L1 and aVF diverge and L2 is predominantly negative. In RAD, L1 and aVF converge, while L2 matters little. Indeterminate axis is diagnosed when all six frontal leads are (more or less) equiphasic. 8 Check whether the criteria for LAHB or LAFB have been met. 9 Look for pathological Q waves. In general these are longer than 0.04 seconds and are more than 25% of the size of the following R wave.
THE BEST CARDIOLOGISTS NEAR HSR LAYOUT Coronary angiography (cardiac catheterisation) This procedure enables the cardiologist to visualise the coronary arteries . It is the standard against which other less-invasive investigations are assessed. Selective catheterisation of the right and left coronary ostia is performed. Contrast is then injected into the vessels and digital tape or disc storage of the images obtained. In most hospitals the patient is admitted on the morning of the test and allowed to go home that afternoon. The procedure is most often performed through the femoral artery (Judkins technique) . This artery can be punctured through the skin under local anaesthetic. A fine softtipped guide wire is then advanced into the artery and the needle withdrawn (Seldinger method). A short guiding sheath can then be placed over the wire and long cardiac catheters advanced through this sheath along a long guide wire into the femoral artery and up via the aorta to the aortic arch. The catheter and wire are advanced under X-ray control. Usually one catheter with a curved tip (pig-tail catheter; is advanced across the aortic valve into the left ventricle where left ventricular pressures are measured via a pressure transducer connected to the other end of the catheter. Measurement of the left ventricular end-diastolic pressure gives an indication of left ventricular function. Raised end-diastolic pressure (over 15 mmHg) suggests left ventricular dysfunction . The catheter is then connected to a pressure injector. This enables injection of a large volume of contrast over a few seconds; for example, 35 mL at 15 mL/second. X-ray recording during injection produces a left ventriculogram , Here left ventricular contraction can be assessed and the ejection fraction (percentage of end-diastolic volume ejected with each systole) estimated. The normal is 60% or more. The figure obtained by this method tends to be higher than that produced by the nuclear imaging method—gated blood pool scanning. The guide wire is reintroduced and the catheter withdrawn to be replaced by one shaped to fit into the right or left coronary orifice...
SAMIKSHA HEART AND DIABETIC CARE IN YELAHANKA Echocardiographic findings in certain cardiac abnormalities It is important to be aware that modern colour flow mapping is so sensitive that small amounts of regurgitation are often detected from quite normal valves. Deciding whether these jets are significant can be difficult and requires experience. Mitral stenosis Thickening and doming of the mitral valve leaflets is visible on M mode and 2D scanning , It may be possible to measure the valve area by planimetry . Secondary changes such as left atrial size and the presence of rheumatic disease of other valves can be seen. Doppler interrogation of the jet of blood entering the left ventricle through the mitral valve will enable estimation of the valve area by a formula called the pressure half-time equation This will usually give accurate and consistent estimates of the valve area and is especially useful for serial measurements over months or years. It will also be possible to detect associated mitral regurgitation with Doppler. Mitral regurgitation and mitral valve prolapse Here the mitral valve may appear normal and abnormal co-aptation of the leaflets is not usually visible . The left atrium will appear enlarged if significant chronic MR is present, and if this is severe left ventricular dilatation will be present. If the MR is due to mitral valve
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