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Important coronary risk factors 1 Existing vascular disease (coronary, cerebral or peripheral) 2 Age 3 Dyslipidaemia 4 Smoking 5 Family history 6 Hypertension 7 Male sex/hormonal factors 8 Diabetes 9 Renal impairment 10 Obesity 11 Inactivity 12 Thrombogenic factors 13 Other dietary factors 14 Homocystinaemia 15 Psychological factors 16 Elevated hsCRP 17 Abnormal CT calcium score/coronary angiogram 18 Left ventricular hypertrophy (hypertensive patients) 19 Abnormal
A risk factor is a demographic characteristic associated with an increased risk of ischaemic heart disease when other variables have been controlled. The presence of a risk factor in an individual increases his or her relative risk of a coronary event (angina, infarction or death). The absolute risk of a coronary event depends on the individual’s total number of risk factors and theirseverity (total risk). Important coronary risk factors are shown in Table 1.1. Risk assessment charts have been developed to estimate a patient’s cardiac risk over a number of years using easily identified risk factors. There are charts for different populations. The charts can be used to predict cardiovascular events or mortality (as in the NHF chart in Fig 1.1 on p. 4) or cardiac risk (systematic coronary risk evaluation system or SCORE charts). These charts can be very helpful in deciding when intervention to reduce risk is warranted; for example, when anti-hypertensive treatment should be commenced for a patient with mild blood pressure elevation. Risk factor reduction involves assessing the presence, severity and importance of risk factors for a
heart doctors in Sahakara Nagar, Bangalore • A clinical approach to hypertension The aims of assessing the hypertensive patient are to: n assess the severity of hypertension n identify any secondary causes n identify aggravating factors n identify target organ damage n assess and manage coexisting CVD risk factors n identify factors affecting the choice of treatment n establish baseline clinical and laboratory data
PAPULAR CARDIOL0GISTS IN BANGALORE A clinical approach to hypertension The aims of assessing the hypertensive patient are to: assess the severity of hypertension identify any secondary causes identify aggravating factors identify target organ damage assess and manage coexisting CVD risk factors identify factors affecting the choice of treatment establish baseline clinical and laboratory data.
THE BEST CARDIOLOGIST IN YELAHANKA A clinical approach to hypertension The aims of assessing the hypertensive patient are to: assess the severity of hypertension identify any secondary causes identify aggravating factors identify target organ damage assess and manage coexisting CVD risk factors identify factors affecting the choice of treatment establish baseline clinical and laboratory data.
THE BEST CARDIOLOGISTS IN YELAHANKAMedical treatment of stable angina Treatment of any disease must begin with a thorough explanation of the likely diagnosis, severity and prognosis. The possible investigations required and steps to be taken if symptoms persist despite treatment should be outlined. A warning (firm, but not alarming) should be given that a prolonged episode of chest pain (more than about 15 minutes) should prompt the patient to get to a hospital without delay. This may also be the first opportunity to speak to the patient about the control of risk factors (e.g. smoking, hyperlipidaemia) that will be important for the long-term prognosis. Risk factor assessment should form part of this initial consultation and include a request for measurement of the serum lipids . a b (a) An MDCT scan of a diseased right coronary artery and the corresponding coronary angiogram (b) An MDCT reconstructed image of the heart and great vessels 140 PRACTICAL CARDIOLOGY A patient with symptoms typical of angina but who seems stable enough not to need admission to hospital should be started on treatment while awaiting investigations to confirm the diagnosis (usually stress testing). Treatment should aim to improve symptoms and, if possible, improve the prognosis (i.e. reduce the risk of unstable angina, infarction or death). Some drugs that help control the symptoms of angina may also improve the prognosis; other treatment may help the longer-term outlook by improving risk factors. Anti-platelet
POPULAR CARDIOLOGIST IN AMRUTHA HALLI , BANGALORE Assessment of patients with hypertension A patient with definite or possible newly diagnosed hypertension needs at least a basic clinical assessment to look for possible aetiology, severity and signs of complications. The history Questioning should be directed towards the following areas. 1 Past history. Has hypertension been diagnosed before? What treatment was instituted? Why was it stopped? 2 Secondary causes. Important questions relate to: • a history of renal disease in the patient or his or her family, recurrent urinary tract infec-­ tions, heavy analgesic use or conditions leading to renal disease (e.g. systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)) • symptoms suggesting phaeochromocytoma (flushing, sweats, palpitations) • symptoms suggesting sleep apnoea • muscle weakness suggesting the hypokalaemia of hyperaldosteronism • Cushing’s syndrome (weight gain, skin changes) • family history of hypertension. 3 Aggravating factors: • high salt intake • high alcohol intake • lack of exercise • use of medications: NSAIDs, appetite suppressants, nasal decongestants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, ergotamine, cyclosporin, oestrogen-containing contraceptive pills • other: use of cocaine, liquorice, amphetamines. 4 Target organ damage: • stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) • angina, dyspnoea • fatigue, oliguria • visual disturbance • claudication. 5 Coexisting risk factors: • smoking • diabetes • lipid levels, if known
The use of invasive hemodynamic monitoring is based on the following principal factors: 1. Difficulty in interpreting clinical and radiographic findings of pulmonary congestion even after a thorough review of noninvasive studies such as an echo-cardiogram. 2. Need for identifying noncardiac causes of arterial hypotension, particularly hypovolemia. 3. Possible contribution of reduced ventricular compliance to impaired hemodynamics, requiring judicious adjustment of intravascular volume to optimize left ventricular filling pressure. 4. Difficulty in assessing the severity and sometimes even determining the presence of lesions such as mitral regurgitation and ventricular septal defect when the cardiac output or the systemic pressures are depressed. 5. Establishing a baseline of hemodynamic measurements and guiding therapy in patients with clinically apparent pulmonary edema or cardiogenic shock. 6. Underestimation of systemic arterial pressure by the cuff method in patients with intense vasoconstriction. The prognosis and the clinical status of patients with STEMI relate to both the cardiac output and the pulmonary artery wedge pressure. Patients
Cardiologist in Rajanukunte, Bangalore • Factors that increase triglyceride levels 1 Obesity 2 Alcohol 3 Diabetes 4 Oestrogen (including HRT in 20% of users) 5 Diuretics 6 Beta-blockers Secondary causes: • Cushing’s syndrome • acromegaly • uraemia • acute hepatitis
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