http://WWW.HEARTDIABETESCARE.COM
SAMIKSHAHEARTCARE 57698d5b9ec66b0b6cfb5b6b False 573 1
OK
background image not found
Found Update results for
'little physical exertion'
9
POPULAR CARDIOLOGISTS IN SAHAKARANAGAR Cardiomyopathies and valvular heart disease Regardless of the status of the coronary arterial tree, both primary and secondary heart muscle disease can produce anginal pain through the imbalance of the oxygen demand and supply. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a relatively common cause of angina in the presence of normal coronary arteries. Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular cause of exertional chest tightness, which is probably due to myocardial ischaemia Exertional chest pain, which may be due to right ventricular angina, is a feature of pulmonary hypertension . Syndrome X There is some confusion regarding the ‘metabolic’ and ‘cardiac’ varieties. The former is a combination of insulin resistance, obesity, pro-inflammatory state and so on, leading to raised cardiovascular risk in the sufferers. The latter is, or should be, a form of stable effort angina that can be ascribed to coronary microvascular malfunction.23 The epicardial coronary tree is normal and the diagnosis is rather difficult to make except by exclusion. Acute coronary syndromes The terminology used to describe acute coronary syndromes (ACSs) continues to evolve as clinicians attempt to adjust to the accumulating evidence of the usefulness of modern cardiac markers and the treatment implications of different results. The most recent terminology is designed to help with treatment decisions based on the earliest clinical information from the patient. This comes from the history and the ECG. When the patient’s symptoms suggest an acute coronary syndrome, the first decisions about diagnosis and treatment are based on the ECG. If there is ST elevation present in a pattern to suggest myocardial infarction, the diagnosis is of ‘ST elevation myocardial infarction’ (STEMI). If there is no ST elevation, the initial diagnosis is of ‘non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome’ (NSTEACS).24 This elegant phrase has replaced ‘non-ST elevation myocardial infarction’ (non- STEMI). The reason is that the diagnosis of infarction cannot be made in the absence of ST elevation until cardiac marker estimations are available. The decisions about treatment, however, need to be made immediately and are based on symptoms and ECG changes.
CARDIOLOGIST IN DODDABOMMASANDRA, BANGALORE Cardiac rehabilitation Although rehabilitation has been a part of the management of patients following a myocardial infarction since the beginning of the last century, ideas have changed radically about the form this should take. In the early 1900s Sir Thomas Lewis insisted his patients remain in bed and be ‘guarded by day and night nursing and helped in every way to avoid voluntary movement or effort’. These severe restrictions were continued for at least six to eight weeks. The thinking was that complete rest would reduce the risk of aneurysm formation and avoid hypoxia that might cause arrhythmias. Even after discharge mild exertion was discouraged for up to a year and return to work was most unusual. In the 1970s periods of bed rest of between one and four weeks were enforced and patients remained in hospital for up to four weeks. It is now clear that this de-conditioning has many adverse physical and psychological effects. Patients with uncomplicated infarcts are now mobilised in hospital within a day or so of admission and are often discharged on the third day if successful primary angioplasty has been performed. Many hospitals provide a supervised rehabilitation program for patients who have had an infarct or episode of unstable angina. The program begins in hospital as soon as possible after admission. It includes a graded exercise regimen and advice about risk factor control. Such programs have many benefits for patients to help them to return quickly to normal life, including work and sexual activity. The supervised exercise regimen helps restore the patient’s confidence. There is clear evidence of the benefits of exercise for patients with ischaemic heart disease.54 Rehabilitation programs have been shown to be cost-effective. Well-conducted programs are tailored to individual patients’ needs and are very popular with many patients.55 There are often long-term exercise groups available for people who have completed the formal classes. Non-cardiac causes of chest pain Pulmonary embolism
THE BEST CARDIOLOGISTS IN YELAHANKA Aortic regurgitation The incompetent aortic valve allows regurgitation of blood from the aorta to the left ventricle during diastole for as long as the aortic diastolic pressure exceeds the left ventricular diastolic pressure. Symptoms: Occur in the late stages of disease and include exertional dyspnoea, fatigue, palpitations (hyperdynamic circulation) and exertional angina. General signs: Marfan’s syndrome may be obvious. The pulse and blood pressure: The pulse is characteristically collapsing; there may be a wide pulse pressure. The neck: Prominent carotid pulsations (Corrigan’s sign). Palpation: The apex beat is characteristically displaced and hyperkinetic. A diastolic thrill may be felt at the left sternal edge when the patient sits up and breathes out. Auscultation): A2 (the aortic component of the second heart sound) may be soft; a decrescendo high-pitched diastolic murmur beginning immediately after the second heart sound and extending for a variable time into diastole—it is loudest at the third and fourth left intercostal spaces; a systolic ejection murmur is usually present (due to associated aortic stenosis or to torrential flow across a normal diameter aortic valve). Signs indicating severe chronic aortic regurgitation: Collapsing pulse; wide pulse pressure; long decrescendo diastolic murmur; left ventricular S3 (third heart sound); soft A2; signs of left ventricular failure. Causes of chronic aortic regurgitation: (i) Rheumatic (rarely the only murmur in this case), congenital; (ii) aortic root dilatation—Marfan’s syndrome, dissecting aneurysm. 8• THE PATIENT WITH A MURMUR 305 a b Valve cusps often thickened and calcified Left ventricle may be hypertrophied Ascending aorta may be dilated Systole Diastole S1 A2 P2 S1 Ejection click (Suggests congenital AS) Normal Mild S1 S1 Moderate S1 P2 A2 S1 Severe Reversed S2 Single (S2)
How sleeping less than 6 hours affects your health After being awake for almost 14-16 hours, our body demands sleep. Minimum sleeping time required for a healthy mind and body is 7-8 hours. Although, this duration varies according to age. Because generally speaking, where a child can sleep for 12-14 hours, grownups can sleep for not more than 9 hours. Sound sleep is very essential otherwise, it can be harmful for our health. Let’s see how sleeping for less than 6 hours affects our health. Headache, weight gain and poor vision: When you sleep for less than 6 hours a day, it can not only give you headache all the time but can lead to a poor vision also. And if continued for a long time, may hamper your eyesight. The lesser you sleep the more weight you gain. And after-effects of gaining weight could be even more hazardous. Memory loss, heart disease, infection: Sleeplessness can have an adverse effect on one’s memory too. A person may find it difficult to remember even simple things. Also, infections can take a longer time to heal because sleep is something that stabilises and balances everything that goes wrong while we are awake. If we don’t get proper sleep, the process of healing takes longer. Lack of sleep can also elevate blood pressure which ultimately affects the heart. Urine overproduction, stammering and accident: Sleeping slows down urinating process but when you are awake for longer hours, you might have to urinate more than usual. Lack of sleep can also make you stammer while speaking. If lack of sleep continues, you may not be able to communicate properly. When you do not have sound sleep, your mental condition would not be stable because of declining concentration. You can be accident prone if you drive in such a condition. These are just a few of the ill effects. Sleeping for less than 5 hours is far more dangerous than you can even think. From behavioural to mental to physical effects, it can harm you in many more ways, So, have a sound sleep to avoid complications in life.
PAPULAR CARDIOLOGISTS IN HEBBALA ECG interpretation: points to remember 1 ECG reports should be short and based on clinical information where possible. 2 Check that the patient’s name is on the ECG and that the paper speed and calibration markers are correct. 3 Measure or estimate the heart rate—3 large squares = 100/minute. 4 Establish the rhythm. Look for P waves (best seen in L2). Are the P waves followed by QRS complexes? Look for anomalously conducted or ectopic beats. 5 Measure the intervals: PR, QRS duration and QT interval (for the latter, consult tables, but normal is less than 50% of the RR interval). 6 If the QRS complex is wide (> 3 small squares) consider the possibilities: LBBB, RBBB, WPW or ventricular rhythm or beats. If the pattern is of LBBB, there is no need in most cases to attempt further interpretation. 7 Estimate the QRS axis. In LAD, L1 and aVF diverge and L2 is predominantly negative. In RAD, L1 and aVF converge, while L2 matters little. Indeterminate axis is diagnosed when all six frontal leads are (more or less) equiphasic. 8 Check whether the criteria for LAHB or LAFB have been met. 9 Look for pathological Q waves. In general these are longer than 0.04 seconds and are more than 25% of the size of the following R wave.
THE BEST CARDIOLOGIST IN HEBBALA Hypertension as a risk factor Hypertension is a risk factor for coronary disease, but even more so for cerebrovascular disease and left ventricular failure.1 Control of blood pressure reduces this risk. Large randomised trials have shown that every 10–14 mmHg reduction in systolic and 5 mmHg reduction in diastolic blood pressure confers a 29% reduction in CHD risk and a 40% reduction in stroke risk. The risk of a coronary event in a man with blood pressure greater than 160/95 is five times the risk in a man with blood pressure of 140/90 or less. Hypertension can be diagnosed only by blood pressure measurements. There is little evidence that high blood pressure causes symptoms, except for malignant hypertension with cerebral oedema. The symptoms often ascribed to hypertension—epistaxis, dizziness, headache and fainting—are no more common in hypertensives than in normotensives. Anxiety (often about the blood pressure) and hyperventilation may explain some of these symptoms.2 The trials providing the above figures have been carried out using diuretics or beta-­blockers in the treatment of hypertension. Because these drugs may adversely affect lipid profiles and therefore coronary risk, it has been suggested that newer agents may produce a greater reduction in the risk of CHD events. However, this has not been proven. There is evidence from metaanalyses of blood pressure lowering trials that beta-blockers are less protective against stroke than other agents. They are more effective than placebo in providing protection against stroke. The reduction in blood pressure that is achieved is still more important than the choice of drug. The trials have shown that blood pressure reduction in the elderly, including those over the age of 80, is associated with reduced cardiovascular morbidity but not all-cause (overall) mortality. Treatment of isolated systolic hypertension, common in the elderly, has also shown benefit in terms of the reduced risk of stroke, cardiac failure and coronary disease.3 As in the case of other risk factors, the greatest absolute benefit in the treatment of hyper-­ tension is gained in those patients with existing heart disease, diabetes or multiple risk factors. Blood pressure is an important component of the total risk score . The effects of hypertension Cardiovascular Sustained hypertension results in increased left ventricular wall thickness (left ventricular hypertro-­ phy, LVH) and may ultimately lead to left ventricular dilatation and cardiac failure. LVH results in higher oxygen demands by the ventricle, making angina more likely. The mechanism by which hypertension is thought to increase CHD risk is mechanical damage to the endothelium, leading to increased permeability and therefore increased atherogenesis. Elevated blood pressure interacts with other hereditary and acquired risk factors, all of which are associated with endothelial dysfunction; some are probably implicated in the genesis of hypertension in the first place.4 Neurological Hypertension
DIABETIC SPECIALIST IN YALAHANKA Syncope and dizziness The history Syncope is a transient loss of consciousness resulting from cerebral anoxia, usually due to inadequate blood flow. Syncope may represent a simple faint or be a symptom of cardiac or neurological disease. Establish whether the patient actually loses consciousness and under what circumstances the syncope occurs—for example, on standing for prolonged periods or standing up suddenly (postural syncope), while passing urine (micturition syncope), on coughing (tussive syncope) or with sudden emotional stress (vasovagal syncope). Find out whether there is any warning such as dizziness or palpitations, and how long the episodes last. Recovery may be spontaneous or require attention from bystanders. Bystanders may also have noticed abnormal movements if the patient has epilepsy, but these can also occur in primary syncope. If the patient’s symptoms appear to be postural, enquire about the use of anti-hypertensive or anti-anginal drugs and other medications that may induce postural hypotension. If the episode is vasovagal, it may be precipitated by something unpleasant like the sight of blood, or it may occur in a hot crowded room; patients often feel nauseated and sweaty before fainting and may have had prior similar episodes, especially during adolescence and young adulthood. The diagnosis of this relatively benign and very common cause of syncope can usually be made from the history. Patients with very typical symptoms rarely require extensive investigations. If syncope is due to an arrhythmia there is often sudden loss of consciousness regardless of the patient’s posture. A history of rapid and irregular palpitations or a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation in the past suggests the possibility of sick sinus syndrome. These patients have intermittent tachycardia, usually due to atrial fibrillation, and episodes of profound bradycardia, often due to complete heart block. Chest pain may also occur if the patient has aortic stenosis or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Exertional syncope may occur in these patients because of obstruction to left ventricular outflow by aortic stenosis or septal hypertrophy . Dizziness that occurs even when the patient is lying down or that is made worse by movements of the head is more likely to be of neurological origin (vertigo), although recurrent tachyarrhythmias may occasionally cause dizziness in any position. Try to decide whether the dizziness is really vertiginous (there is a sensation of movement or spinning of the surroundings or the patient’s head), or whether it is a presyncopal feeling. A family history of syncope or sudden death raises the possibility of an ion channel abnormality (long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy). Attempts should be made to find out what the diagnosis was for the affected relatives. A past history of severe structural heart disease, especially heart failure,
GOOD AND WELL CARDIOLOGISTS IN SILKBOARD BANGALORE Hypertension as a risk factor Hypertension is a risk factor for coronary disease, but even more so for cerebrovascular disease and left ventricular failure.1 Control of blood pressure reduces this risk. Large randomised trials have shown that every 10–14 mmHg reduction in systolic and 5 mmHg reduction in diastolic blood pressure confers a 29% reduction in CHD risk and a 40% reduction in stroke risk. The risk of a coronary event in a man with blood pressure greater than 160/95 is five times the risk in a man with blood pressure of 140/90 or less. Hypertension can be diagnosed only by blood pressure measurements. There is little evidence that high blood pressure causes symptoms, except for malignant hypertension with cerebral oedema. The symptoms often ascribed to hypertension—epistaxis, dizziness, headache and fainting—are no more common in hypertensives than in normotensives. Anxiety (often about the blood pressure) and hyperventilation may explain some of these symptoms.2 The trials providing the above figures have been carried out using diuretics or beta-­blockers in the treatment of hypertension. Because these drugs may adversely affect lipid profiles and therefore coronary risk, it has been suggested that newer agents may produce a greater reduction in the risk of CHD events. However, this has not been proven. There is evidence from metaanalyses of blood pressure lowering trials that beta-blockers are less protective against stroke than other agents. They are more effective than placebo in providing protection against stroke. The reduction in blood pressure that is achieved is still more important than the choice of drug. The trials have shown that blood pressure reduction in the elderly, including those over the age of 80, is associated with reduced cardiovascular morbidity but not all-cause (overall) mortality. Treatment of isolated systolic hypertension, common in the elderly, has also shown benefit in terms of the reduced risk of stroke, cardiac failure and coronary disease.3 As in the case of other risk factors, the greatest absolute benefit in the treatment of hyper-­ tension is gained in those patients with existing heart disease, diabetes or multiple risk
HEART SPECIALISTS IN HEBBALABANGALORE Case-based learning: cardiovascular risk assessment Mr RF is 60 years old and presents for a check-up because he is concerned he may be at risk of heart disease. Objectives for the group to understand How should this type of request be managed What can be done to assess an individual’s future cardiac risk, and what can be done to improve the prognosis for those at increased risk Epidemiology and population health The presenter should ask the group to consider the concept of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and the differences between population risk factors and those for an individual. How did the concept of risk factors arise Presenting symptoms and clinical examination What questions should be asked of Mr RF to begin the risk factor assessment 1 Is there a history of ischaemic heart disease or symptoms of heart disease 2 Has his cholesterol level been checked in the past What was itHas it been treated with diet or drugs, or both Has the level improved 3 Is he a diabetic, or has he had an abnormal blood sugar measurement 4 Is there a history of high blood pressure Has this been treated If so, how 5 Is there a history of heart disease in the familIf so, who has been affected and at what age 6 Does he smoke? How many cigarettes a day If he has ceased smoking, when did he stop 7 Does he exercise regularly 8 Have any cardiac investigations been performed before What were the results 9 Is there a history of peripheral arterial disease (claudication) or erectile dysfunction The group should appreciate that considerable information about risk can be obtained by asking simple questions. What physical examination should be performed
1
false