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HEART SPEACIALISTS IN BANGALORE Stress echocardiography Ischaemic areas of myocardium are known to have reduced contraction compared with normal areas. This can be demonstrated by high-quality echocardiograms. A number of standard views of the heart are obtained and the wall is divided into regions that are assessed for reduced motion. The echo equipment must be designed to store rest images and to present them next to stress images on a split screen so that direct comparison can be made. The stress can be provided by exercise or dobutamine infusion. Exercise echocardiography is difficult to perform because of movement problems and there is quite high inter-reporter variability, but both techniques can approach the accuracy of sestamibi testing in experienced hands. It is not possible to obtain images of adequate quality in all patients.
THE BEST CARDIOLOGISTS IN YELAHANKA Indications for coronary angiography 1 Angina not responding to medical treatment in a patient without contraindications (e.g. extreme old age—usually older than about 85 these days—or severe co-morbidities) to cardiac surgery or angioplasty. 2 Continuing chest pain whose cause is not clear despite non-invasive investigations. The procedure may well be worthwhile if it reveals normal coronary arteries and prevents a patient being treated unnecessarily with more and more anti-anginal drugs. Non-invasive investigations are more often equivocal in women, and more women than men are found to have normal coronaries at angiography. 3 Preparation of a patient older than 35 or so for some other cardiac surgery (e.g. valve replacement). The surgeon needs to know whether significant coronary disease is present so that coronary grafting can be performed at the time of valve surgery. Otherwise, patients are at risk of ischaemic problems in the post-operative period. 4 Diagnosis of cardiomyopathy (p. 267) by excluding coronary artery disease and infarction as the cause of angina or cardiac failure. These patients may benefit from revascularisation if significant coronary disease is also present (‘ischaemic cardiomyopathy’). 5 Investigation of patients following myocardial infarction. Routine transfer to a centre with angiographic facilities after successful thrombolytic treatment is a grade D recommendation. There is no proof that a patient without continuing ischaemia has an improved prognosis when angiography and revascularisation are carried out routinely after infarction. The Open Artery Trial results suggest there is no benefit compared with optimal medical treatment for patients without ischaemic symptoms in having an occluded vessel opened five days or more after an infarction. However, spontaneous or induced ischaemia (by modified stress testing or perfusion imaging) leads to a grade B recommendation for angiography and intervention. The management of post-infarct patients is definitely easier if the coronary anatomy is known, and many units adopt the policy of early (within a week) angiography of infarct patients without contraindications to revascularisation. 6 Non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes (p. 156). 7 Acute myocardial infarction in a unit where primary angioplasty can be performed
IHEART SPECIALISTS IN HEBBALA ndications for coronary angiography 1 Angina not responding to medical treatment in a patient without contraindications (e.g. extreme old age—usually older than about 85 these days—or severe co-morbidities) to cardiac surgery or angioplasty. 2 Continuing chest pain whose cause is not clear despite non-invasive investigations. The procedure may well be worthwhile if it reveals normal coronary arteries and prevents a patient being treated unnecessarily with more and more anti-anginal drugs. Non-invasive investigations are more often equivocal in women, and more women than men are found to have normal coronaries at angiography. 3 Preparation of a patient older than 35 or so for some other cardiac surgery (e.g. valve replacement). The surgeon needs to know whether significant coronary disease is present so that coronary grafting can be performed at the time of valve surgery. Otherwise, patients are at risk of ischaemic problems in the post-operative period. 4 Diagnosis of cardiomyopathy (p. 267) by excluding coronary artery disease and infarction as the cause of angina or cardiac failure. These patients may benefit from revascularisation if significant coronary disease is also present (‘ischaemic cardiomyopathy’). 5 Investigation of patients following myocardial infarction. Routine transfer to a centre with angiographic facilities after successful thrombolytic treatment is a grade D recommendation. There is no proof that a patient without continuing ischaemia has an improved prognosis when angiography and revascularisation are carried out routinely after infarction. The Open Artery Trial results suggest there is no benefit compared with optimal medical treatment for patients without ischaemic symptoms in having an occluded vessel opened five days or more after an infarction. However, spontaneous or induced ischaemia (by modified stress testing or perfusion imaging) leads to a grade B recommendation for angiography and intervention. The management of post-infarct patients is definitely easier if the coronary anatomy is known, and many units adopt the policy of early (within a week) angiography of infarct patients without contraindications to revascularisation. 6 Non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes . 7 Acute myocardial infarction in a unit where primary angioplasty can be performed . Risks of cardiac catheterisation Cardiac catheterisation is an invasive procedure and patients must be aware of
POPULAR CARDIOLOGIST IN AMRUTHA HALLI , BANGALORE Assessment of patients with hypertension A patient with definite or possible newly diagnosed hypertension needs at least a basic clinical assessment to look for possible aetiology, severity and signs of complications. The history Questioning should be directed towards the following areas. 1 Past history. Has hypertension been diagnosed before? What treatment was instituted? Why was it stopped? 2 Secondary causes. Important questions relate to: • a history of renal disease in the patient or his or her family, recurrent urinary tract infec-­ tions, heavy analgesic use or conditions leading to renal disease (e.g. systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)) • symptoms suggesting phaeochromocytoma (flushing, sweats, palpitations) • symptoms suggesting sleep apnoea • muscle weakness suggesting the hypokalaemia of hyperaldosteronism • Cushing’s syndrome (weight gain, skin changes) • family history of hypertension. 3 Aggravating factors: • high salt intake • high alcohol intake • lack of exercise • use of medications: NSAIDs, appetite suppressants, nasal decongestants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, ergotamine, cyclosporin, oestrogen-containing contraceptive pills • other: use of cocaine, liquorice, amphetamines. 4 Target organ damage: • stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) • angina, dyspnoea • fatigue, oliguria • visual disturbance • claudication. 5 Coexisting risk factors: • smoking • diabetes • lipid levels, if known
CCARDIOLOGIST IN DODDABOMMASANDRA, BANGALORE ardiac drugs A detailed drug history is essential. Ask about anti-anginal and anti-failure drugs. It is important to attempt to ensure that the patient gets these drugs on the day of the operation. This applies most of all to beta-blockers. Withdrawal of beta-blockers used for angina can precipitate unstable angina or an infarct. There is also evidence that the use of beta-blockers in the peri-operative period reduces the risk of significant ischaemic events.36 This is probably not the case for nitrates and calcium antagonists. Aspirin used for any patient with ischaemic heart disease should be stopped for the shortest possible period before surgery (about three days) . Warfarin, when used for protection against embolic events for atrial fibrillation, can usually be stopped four or five days pre-op and begun again soon afterwards. A possible exception is a patient with atrial fibrillation and a recent embolic event or a left atrial thrombus seen on echo. These patients may need to change to heparin, as detailed below. A history of infective endocarditis, known valvular heart disease (even if mild) or the presence of a prosthetic cardiac valve may be an indication for antibiotic prophylaxis. Patients with a prosthetic heart valve who are taking warfarin need careful management. If the valve is in the aortic position and it is a modern disc valve, it may be safe to allow the INR to fall moderately (to 1.8 or so) by the day of surgery and then to resume warfarin as soon as the patient can swallow. If the surgeon requires the INR to have fallen to normal or the patient has a valve in the mitral position, then cessation of warfarin and use of heparin is necessary. Normally the patient omits a warfarin dose and then is admitted to hospital three or four days before surgery. Intravenous heparin is begun and the APPT adjusted to 2 or 2.5 times normal. The heparin is stopped some hours before surgery and begun as soon afterwards as the surgeon allows. It is now possible, however, to use low molecular weight heparin instead
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