http://WWW.HEARTDIABETESCARE.COM
SAMIKSHAHEARTCARE 57698d5b9ec66b0b6cfb5b6b False 536 1
OK
background image not found
Found Update results for
'immune system problem'
5
The use of invasive hemodynamic monitoring is based on the following principal factors: 1. Difficulty in interpreting clinical and radiographic findings of pulmonary congestion even after a thorough review of noninvasive studies such as an echo-cardiogram. 2. Need for identifying noncardiac causes of arterial hypotension, particularly hypovolemia. 3. Possible contribution of reduced ventricular compliance to impaired hemodynamics, requiring judicious adjustment of intravascular volume to optimize left ventricular filling pressure. 4. Difficulty in assessing the severity and sometimes even determining the presence of lesions such as mitral regurgitation and ventricular septal defect when the cardiac output or the systemic pressures are depressed. 5. Establishing a baseline of hemodynamic measurements and guiding therapy in patients with clinically apparent pulmonary edema or cardiogenic shock. 6. Underestimation of systemic arterial pressure by the cuff method in patients with intense vasoconstriction. The prognosis and the clinical status of patients with STEMI relate to both the cardiac output and the pulmonary artery wedge pressure. Patients
A risk factor is a demographic characteristic associated with an increased risk of ischaemic heart disease when other variables have been controlled. The presence of a risk factor in an individual increases his or her relative risk of a coronary event (angina, infarction or death). The absolute risk of a coronary event depends on the individual’s total number of risk factors and theirseverity (total risk). Important coronary risk factors are shown in Table 1.1. Risk assessment charts have been developed to estimate a patient’s cardiac risk over a number of years using easily identified risk factors. There are charts for different populations. The charts can be used to predict cardiovascular events or mortality (as in the NHF chart in Fig 1.1 on p. 4) or cardiac risk (systematic coronary risk evaluation system or SCORE charts). These charts can be very helpful in deciding when intervention to reduce risk is warranted; for example, when anti-hypertensive treatment should be commenced for a patient with mild blood pressure elevation. Risk factor reduction involves assessing the presence, severity and importance of risk factors for a
Heart and diabetic center in yelahanka. this centre was basically established to cater to all the patients with heart and diabetic problems under one roof
This ordinarily consists of monitoring of  is suspected. heart rate and rhythm,  repeated measurement of systemic arterial pressure by cuff,  obtaining chest radiographs to detect heart failure,  repeated auscultation of the lung fields for pulmonary congestion,  measurement of urine flow,  examination of the skin and mucous membranes for evidence of the adequacy of perfusion, and
THE HYPERDYNAMIC STATE. MI with hyperdynamic state—that is, elevation of sinus rate, arterial pressure, and cardiac index, occurring singly or together in the presence of a normal or low left ventricular filling pressure—and if other causes of tachycardia such as fever, infection, and pericarditis can be excluded, treatment with beta blockers is indicated. Presumably, the increased heart rate and blood pressure are the result of inappropriate activation of the sympathetic nervous system, possibly secondary to augmented release of catecholamines, pain and anxiety, or some combination of these.
1
false