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How sleeping less than 6 hours affects your health After being awake for almost 14-16 hours, our body demands sleep. Minimum sleeping time required for a healthy mind and body is 7-8 hours. Although, this duration varies according to age. Because generally speaking, where a child can sleep for 12-14 hours, grownups can sleep for not more than 9 hours. Sound sleep is very essential otherwise, it can be harmful for our health. Let’s see how sleeping for less than 6 hours affects our health. Headache, weight gain and poor vision: When you sleep for less than 6 hours a day, it can not only give you headache all the time but can lead to a poor vision also. And if continued for a long time, may hamper your eyesight. The lesser you sleep the more weight you gain. And after-effects of gaining weight could be even more hazardous. Memory loss, heart disease, infection: Sleeplessness can have an adverse effect on one’s memory too. A person may find it difficult to remember even simple things. Also, infections can take a longer time to heal because sleep is something that stabilises and balances everything that goes wrong while we are awake. If we don’t get proper sleep, the process of healing takes longer. Lack of sleep can also elevate blood pressure which ultimately affects the heart. Urine overproduction, stammering and accident: Sleeping slows down urinating process but when you are awake for longer hours, you might have to urinate more than usual. Lack of sleep can also make you stammer while speaking. If lack of sleep continues, you may not be able to communicate properly. When you do not have sound sleep, your mental condition would not be stable because of declining concentration. You can be accident prone if you drive in such a condition. These are just a few of the ill effects. Sleeping for less than 5 hours is far more dangerous than you can even think. From behavioural to mental to physical effects, it can harm you in many more ways, So, have a sound sleep to avoid complications in life.
THE HYPERDYNAMIC STATE. MI with hyperdynamic state—that is, elevation of sinus rate, arterial pressure, and cardiac index, occurring singly or together in the presence of a normal or low left ventricular filling pressure—and if other causes of tachycardia such as fever, infection, and pericarditis can be excluded, treatment with beta blockers is indicated. Presumably, the increased heart rate and blood pressure are the result of inappropriate activation of the sympathetic nervous system, possibly secondary to augmented release of catecholamines, pain and anxiety, or some combination of these.
A risk factor is a demographic characteristic associated with an increased risk of ischaemic heart disease when other variables have been controlled. The presence of a risk factor in an individual increases his or her relative risk of a coronary event (angina, infarction or death). The absolute risk of a coronary event depends on the individual’s total number of risk factors and theirseverity (total risk). Important coronary risk factors are shown in Table 1.1. Risk assessment charts have been developed to estimate a patient’s cardiac risk over a number of years using easily identified risk factors. There are charts for different populations. The charts can be used to predict cardiovascular events or mortality (as in the NHF chart in Fig 1.1 on p. 4) or cardiac risk (systematic coronary risk evaluation system or SCORE charts). These charts can be very helpful in deciding when intervention to reduce risk is warranted; for example, when anti-hypertensive treatment should be commenced for a patient with mild blood pressure elevation. Risk factor reduction involves assessing the presence, severity and importance of risk factors for a
heart doctors in Sahakara Nagar, Bangalore • A clinical approach to hypertension The aims of assessing the hypertensive patient are to: n assess the severity of hypertension n identify any secondary causes n identify aggravating factors n identify target organ damage n assess and manage coexisting CVD risk factors n identify factors affecting the choice of treatment n establish baseline clinical and laboratory data
PAPULAR CARDIOL0GISTS IN BANGALORE A clinical approach to hypertension The aims of assessing the hypertensive patient are to: assess the severity of hypertension identify any secondary causes identify aggravating factors identify target organ damage assess and manage coexisting CVD risk factors identify factors affecting the choice of treatment establish baseline clinical and laboratory data.
THE BEST CARDIOLOGIST IN YELAHANKA A clinical approach to hypertension The aims of assessing the hypertensive patient are to: assess the severity of hypertension identify any secondary causes identify aggravating factors identify target organ damage assess and manage coexisting CVD risk factors identify factors affecting the choice of treatment establish baseline clinical and laboratory data.
THE BEST CARDIOLOGISTS IN YELAHANKAMedical treatment of stable angina Treatment of any disease must begin with a thorough explanation of the likely diagnosis, severity and prognosis. The possible investigations required and steps to be taken if symptoms persist despite treatment should be outlined. A warning (firm, but not alarming) should be given that a prolonged episode of chest pain (more than about 15 minutes) should prompt the patient to get to a hospital without delay. This may also be the first opportunity to speak to the patient about the control of risk factors (e.g. smoking, hyperlipidaemia) that will be important for the long-term prognosis. Risk factor assessment should form part of this initial consultation and include a request for measurement of the serum lipids . a b (a) An MDCT scan of a diseased right coronary artery and the corresponding coronary angiogram (b) An MDCT reconstructed image of the heart and great vessels 140 PRACTICAL CARDIOLOGY A patient with symptoms typical of angina but who seems stable enough not to need admission to hospital should be started on treatment while awaiting investigations to confirm the diagnosis (usually stress testing). Treatment should aim to improve symptoms and, if possible, improve the prognosis (i.e. reduce the risk of unstable angina, infarction or death). Some drugs that help control the symptoms of angina may also improve the prognosis; other treatment may help the longer-term outlook by improving risk factors. Anti-platelet
POPULAR CARDIOLOGIST IN AMRUTHA HALLI , BANGALORE Assessment of patients with hypertension A patient with definite or possible newly diagnosed hypertension needs at least a basic clinical assessment to look for possible aetiology, severity and signs of complications. The history Questioning should be directed towards the following areas. 1 Past history. Has hypertension been diagnosed before? What treatment was instituted? Why was it stopped? 2 Secondary causes. Important questions relate to: • a history of renal disease in the patient or his or her family, recurrent urinary tract infec-­ tions, heavy analgesic use or conditions leading to renal disease (e.g. systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)) • symptoms suggesting phaeochromocytoma (flushing, sweats, palpitations) • symptoms suggesting sleep apnoea • muscle weakness suggesting the hypokalaemia of hyperaldosteronism • Cushing’s syndrome (weight gain, skin changes) • family history of hypertension. 3 Aggravating factors: • high salt intake • high alcohol intake • lack of exercise • use of medications: NSAIDs, appetite suppressants, nasal decongestants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, ergotamine, cyclosporin, oestrogen-containing contraceptive pills • other: use of cocaine, liquorice, amphetamines. 4 Target organ damage: • stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) • angina, dyspnoea • fatigue, oliguria • visual disturbance • claudication. 5 Coexisting risk factors: • smoking • diabetes • lipid levels, if known
ECHOCARDIOLOGIST IN GANGAMMA CIRCLE Mitral regurgitation A regurgitant mitral valve allows part of the left ventricular stroke volume to regurgitate into the left atrium, imposing a volume load on both the left atrium and the left ventricle. Symptoms: Dyspnoea (increased left atrial pressure); fatigue (decreased cardiac output). General signs: Tachypnoea. The pulse: Normal, or sharp upstroke due to rapid left ventricular decompression; atrial fibrillation is relatively common. Palpation: The apex beat may be displaced, diffuse and hyperdynamic if left ventricular enlargement has occurred; a pansystolic thrill may be present at the apex; a parasternal impulse (due to left atrial enlargement behind the right ventricle—the left atrium is often larger in mitral regurgitation than in mitral stenosis and can be enormous). All these signs suggest severe mitral regurgitation. Auscultation Soft or absent S1 (by the end of diastole, atrial and ventricular pressures have equalised and the valve cusps have drifted back together); left ventricular S3, due to rapid left ventricular filling in early diastole; pansystolic murmur maximal at the apex and usually radiating towards the axilla. Causes of chronic mitral regurgitation: (i) Degenerative; (ii) rheumatic; (iii) mitral valve prolapse; (iv) papillary muscle dysfunction, due to left ventricular failure or ischaemia.
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