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POPULAR CARDIOLOGIST IN AMRUTHA HALLI , BANGALORE Assessment of patients with hypertension A patient with definite or possible newly diagnosed hypertension needs at least a basic clinical assessment to look for possible aetiology, severity and signs of complications. The history Questioning should be directed towards the following areas. 1 Past history. Has hypertension been diagnosed before? What treatment was instituted? Why was it stopped? 2 Secondary causes. Important questions relate to: • a history of renal disease in the patient or his or her family, recurrent urinary tract infec-­ tions, heavy analgesic use or conditions leading to renal disease (e.g. systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)) • symptoms suggesting phaeochromocytoma (flushing, sweats, palpitations) • symptoms suggesting sleep apnoea • muscle weakness suggesting the hypokalaemia of hyperaldosteronism • Cushing’s syndrome (weight gain, skin changes) • family history of hypertension. 3 Aggravating factors: • high salt intake • high alcohol intake • lack of exercise • use of medications: NSAIDs, appetite suppressants, nasal decongestants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, ergotamine, cyclosporin, oestrogen-containing contraceptive pills • other: use of cocaine, liquorice, amphetamines. 4 Target organ damage: • stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) • angina, dyspnoea • fatigue, oliguria • visual disturbance • claudication. 5 Coexisting risk factors: • smoking • diabetes • lipid levels, if known
THE BEST CARDIOLOGISTS IN YELAHANKA Pulmonary hypertension Pulmonary hypertension is an uncommon but important cause of dyspnoea. Many patients with this chronic and often severe illness will have raised pulmonary artery pressures as a result of a cardiac or respiratory illness. Other patients may present with increasing dyspnoea without an obvious cardiac or respiratory problem. Idiopathic (primary) pulmonary hypertension (IPH) is diagnosed only when other causes of pulmonary hypertension have been excluded. By definition, pulmonary hypertension is present when the mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) exceeds 25 mmHg at rest or 30 mmHg during exercise. The classification of pulmonary hypertension has been revised. The Venice classification was released in 2003. The term ‘primary pulmonary hypertension’ has been replaced with ‘idiopathic pulmonary hypertension’ Patients may have used fenfluramine or phenermine (appetite-suppressing drugs), or both. Use of these drugs for long periods has been associated with the greatest risk of developing pulmonary hypertension. In cases of IPH there may be a family history (6%; autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance, 20–80%). The majority of familial cases are associates with a mutation on the BMPR2 gene. There may be associated symptoms including fatigue, chest pain, syncope and oedema. Cough and haemoptysis can be present. 270 PRACTICAL CARDIOLOGY The examination may help in assessing the severity of the patient’s dyspnoea as he or she undresses. Try to work out the patient’s functional class from the history and examination (p. 256) (NYHA I–IIII, often called the NYHA–WHO class when related to pulmonary hypertension). There may be signs of chronic lung disease or congenital heart disease, or specific signs of pulmonary hypertension and right heart failure (p. 257). Investigations are directed at finding an underlying reason for pulmonary hypertension— idiopathic pulmonary hypertension is a diagnosis of exclusion—and at assessing its severity and potential reversibility. The chest X-ray is abnormal in 90% of IPH patients. It may show pulmonary fibrosis or an abnormal cardiac silhouette—RV dilatation. There may be large proximal pulmonary arteries that appear ‘pruned’ in the periphery, and the heart may appear enlarged because of right ventricle dilatation) Respiratory function tests may show a normal, restrictive or obstructive pattern. Moderate pulmonary hypertension itself is associated with a reduction in the diffusing capacity for the carbon monoxide test (DLCO) to about 50% of predicted. On the ECG look for signs of right heart strain or hypertrophy, which are present in up to 90% of patients The blood gas measurements may show hypercapnia—elevated pCO2 in hypoventilation syndromes—but hypocapnia is more common in IPH because of increased alveolar ventilation. Mild hypoxia (reduction in pO2) may be present in IPH, and is more severe when pulmonary hypertension is secondary to lung disease. On CT pulmonary angiogram (CTPA), ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) lung scan or Doppler venograms look for a deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and PE and assess the extent of involvement of the pulmonary bed. A high-resolution CT scan of the lungs is the best way of looking for interstitial lung disease. The six-minute walking test predicts survival and correlates with the NYHA–WHO class. Reduction in arterial oxygen concentration of more than 10% during this test predicts an almost threefold mortality risk over 29 months. Patients unable to manage 332 m in six minutes also have an adverse prognosis.
Important coronary risk factors 1 Existing vascular disease (coronary, cerebral or peripheral) 2 Age 3 Dyslipidaemia 4 Smoking 5 Family history 6 Hypertension 7 Male sex/hormonal factors 8 Diabetes 9 Renal impairment 10 Obesity 11 Inactivity 12 Thrombogenic factors 13 Other dietary factors 14 Homocystinaemia 15 Psychological factors 16 Elevated hsCRP 17 Abnormal CT calcium score/coronary angiogram 18 Left ventricular hypertrophy (hypertensive patients) 19 Abnormal
HEART DOCTORS IN CHIKKAJALA, BANGALORE; Pulmonary hypertension Pulmonary hypertension is an uncommon but important cause of dyspnoea. Many patients with this chronic and often severe illness will have raised pulmonary artery pressures as a result of a cardiac or respiratory illness. Other patients may present with increasing dyspnoea without an obvious cardiac or respiratory problem. Idiopathic (primary) pulmonary hypertension (IPH) is diagnosed only when other causes of pulmonary hypertension have been excluded. By definition, pulmonary hypertension is present when the mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) exceeds 25 mmHg at rest or 30 mmHg during exercise. The classification of pulmonary hypertension has been revised. The Venice classification was released in 2003. The term ‘primary pulmonary hypertension’ has been replaced with ‘idiopathic pulmonary hypertension’ . Patients may have used fenfluramine or phenermine (appetite-suppressing drugs), or both. Use of these drugs for long periods has been associated with the greatest risk of developing pulmonary hypertension. In cases of IPH there may be a family history (6%; autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance, 20–80%). The majority of familial cases are associates with a mutation on the BMPR2 gene. There may be associated symptoms including fatigue, chest pain, syncope and oedema. Cough and haemoptysis can be present.
THE CARDIOLOGY CLINICS IN BANGALORE Important coronary risk factors 1 Existing vascular disease (coronary, cerebral or peripheral) 2 Age 3 Dyslipidaemia 4 Smoking 5 Family history 6 Hypertension 7 Male sex/hormonal factors 8 Diabetes 9 Renal impairment 10 Obesity 11 Inactivity 12 Thrombogenic factors 13 Other dietary factors 14 Homocystinaemia 15 Psychological factors 16 Elevated hsCRP 17 Abnormal CT calcium score/coronary angiogram 18 Left ventricular hypertrophy (hypertensive patients) 19 Abnormal
CCARDIOLOGIST IN DODDABOMMASANDRA, BANGALORE ardiac drugs A detailed drug history is essential. Ask about anti-anginal and anti-failure drugs. It is important to attempt to ensure that the patient gets these drugs on the day of the operation. This applies most of all to beta-blockers. Withdrawal of beta-blockers used for angina can precipitate unstable angina or an infarct. There is also evidence that the use of beta-blockers in the peri-operative period reduces the risk of significant ischaemic events.36 This is probably not the case for nitrates and calcium antagonists. Aspirin used for any patient with ischaemic heart disease should be stopped for the shortest possible period before surgery (about three days) . Warfarin, when used for protection against embolic events for atrial fibrillation, can usually be stopped four or five days pre-op and begun again soon afterwards. A possible exception is a patient with atrial fibrillation and a recent embolic event or a left atrial thrombus seen on echo. These patients may need to change to heparin, as detailed below. A history of infective endocarditis, known valvular heart disease (even if mild) or the presence of a prosthetic cardiac valve may be an indication for antibiotic prophylaxis. Patients with a prosthetic heart valve who are taking warfarin need careful management. If the valve is in the aortic position and it is a modern disc valve, it may be safe to allow the INR to fall moderately (to 1.8 or so) by the day of surgery and then to resume warfarin as soon as the patient can swallow. If the surgeon requires the INR to have fallen to normal or the patient has a valve in the mitral position, then cessation of warfarin and use of heparin is necessary. Normally the patient omits a warfarin dose and then is admitted to hospital three or four days before surgery. Intravenous heparin is begun and the APPT adjusted to 2 or 2.5 times normal. The heparin is stopped some hours before surgery and begun as soon afterwards as the surgeon allows. It is now possible, however, to use low molecular weight heparin instead
HEART SPECIALISTS IN GANGAMMA CIRCLE BANGALORE Cardiac drugs A detailed drug history is essential. Ask about anti-anginal and anti-failure drugs. It is important to attempt to ensure that the patient gets these drugs on the day of the operation. This applies most of all to beta-blockers. Withdrawal of beta-blockers used for angina can precipitate unstable angina or an infarct. There is also evidence that the use of beta-blockers in the peri-operative period reduces the risk of significant ischaemic events.36 This is probably not the case for nitrates and calcium antagonists. Aspirin used for any patient with ischaemic heart disease should be stopped for the shortest possible period before surgery (about three days) Warfarin, when used for protection against embolic events for atrial fibrillation, can usually be stopped four or five days pre-op and begun again soon afterwards. A possible exception is a patient with atrial fibrillation and a recent embolic event or a left atrial thrombus seen on echo. These patients may need to change to heparin, as detailed below. A history of infective endocarditis, known valvular heart disease (even if mild) or the presence of a prosthetic cardiac valve may be an indication for antibiotic prophylaxis. Patients with a prosthetic heart valve who are taking warfarin need careful management. If the valve is in the aortic position and it is a modern disc valve, it may be safe to allow the INR to fall moderately (to 1.8 or so) by the day of surgery and then to resume warfarin as soon as the patient can swallow. If the surgeon requires the INR to have fallen to normal or the patient has a valve in the mitral position, then cessation of warfarin and use of heparin is necessary. Normally the patient omits a warfarin dose and then is admitted to hospital three or four days before surgery. Intravenous heparin is begun and the APPT adjusted to 2 or 2.5 times normal. The heparin is stopped some hours before surgery and begun as soon afterwards as the surgeon allows. It is now possible, however, to use low molecular weight heparin instead. This can sometimes be given at home. Enoxaparin can be given daily in a dose of up to 2 mg/kg. Blood tests are not needed and subcutaneous injections are used, which means an intravenous infusion is not required. .
POPULAR CARDIOLOGISTS IN H S R LAYOUT Ventricular tachycardia Ventricular tachycardia is defined as three or more ventricular ectopic beats at a rate over 100/minute. It is said to be sustained if it lasts more than 30 seconds. Most broad-complex tachycardias are ventricular (rather than supraventricular with aberrant conduction). The diagnosis of VT is greatly strengthened if there is a history of myocardial infarction or cardiac failure but, oddly enough, the patient’s haemodynamics are of no help. A number of criteria have evolved over the years to help ascertain the diagnosis of VT over aberrancy. These include: evidence of AV dissociation—P waves can be seen unrelated to the QRS complexes (they are usually visible only at relatively slow VT rates) the presence of supraventricular capture or fusion beats visible retrograde conduction with 2:1 block (P waves visible following every second complex) the presence of monophasic R, qR or QR patterns in V1, provided a septal infarction has not modified a RBBB a taller left rabbit ear in RR' or qRR' complexes in V1 n QS complexes in V1 with a slow S descent and sharp upstroke—the opposite of LBBB—or a broad small primary R wave in rS morphology (the Rosenbaum pattern) RAD in the frontal plane with LBBB-like QRS complexes
POPULAR CARDIOLOGISTS IN SAHAKARANAGAR Cardiomyopathies and valvular heart disease Regardless of the status of the coronary arterial tree, both primary and secondary heart muscle disease can produce anginal pain through the imbalance of the oxygen demand and supply. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a relatively common cause of angina in the presence of normal coronary arteries. Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular cause of exertional chest tightness, which is probably due to myocardial ischaemia Exertional chest pain, which may be due to right ventricular angina, is a feature of pulmonary hypertension . Syndrome X There is some confusion regarding the ‘metabolic’ and ‘cardiac’ varieties. The former is a combination of insulin resistance, obesity, pro-inflammatory state and so on, leading to raised cardiovascular risk in the sufferers. The latter is, or should be, a form of stable effort angina that can be ascribed to coronary microvascular malfunction.23 The epicardial coronary tree is normal and the diagnosis is rather difficult to make except by exclusion. Acute coronary syndromes The terminology used to describe acute coronary syndromes (ACSs) continues to evolve as clinicians attempt to adjust to the accumulating evidence of the usefulness of modern cardiac markers and the treatment implications of different results. The most recent terminology is designed to help with treatment decisions based on the earliest clinical information from the patient. This comes from the history and the ECG. When the patient’s symptoms suggest an acute coronary syndrome, the first decisions about diagnosis and treatment are based on the ECG. If there is ST elevation present in a pattern to suggest myocardial infarction, the diagnosis is of ‘ST elevation myocardial infarction’ (STEMI). If there is no ST elevation, the initial diagnosis is of ‘non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome’ (NSTEACS).24 This elegant phrase has replaced ‘non-ST elevation myocardial infarction’ (non- STEMI). The reason is that the diagnosis of infarction cannot be made in the absence of ST elevation until cardiac marker estimations are available. The decisions about treatment, however, need to be made immediately and are based on symptoms and ECG changes.
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