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HEART SPEACIALISTS IN BANGALORE Stress echocardiography Ischaemic areas of myocardium are known to have reduced contraction compared with normal areas. This can be demonstrated by high-quality echocardiograms. A number of standard views of the heart are obtained and the wall is divided into regions that are assessed for reduced motion. The echo equipment must be designed to store rest images and to present them next to stress images on a split screen so that direct comparison can be made. The stress can be provided by exercise or dobutamine infusion. Exercise echocardiography is difficult to perform because of movement problems and there is quite high inter-reporter variability, but both techniques can approach the accuracy of sestamibi testing in experienced hands. It is not possible to obtain images of adequate quality in all patients.
CARDIOLOGISTS IN HEBBALA Risk stratification using myocardial perfusion scans A normal perfusion scan is associated with a good prognosis. The annual rate of myocardial infarction of cardiac death is < 1%, at least for some years. Stress echocardiography Ischaemic areas of myocardium are known to have reduced contraction compared with normal areas. This can be demonstrated by high-quality echocardiograms. A number of standard views of the heart are obtained and the wall is divided into regions that are assessed for reduced motion. The echo equipment must be designed to store rest images and to present them next to stress images on a split screen so that direct comparison can be made. The stress can be provided by exercise or dobutamine infusion. Exercise echocardiography is difficult to perform because of movement problems and there is quite high inter-reporter variability, but both techniques can approach the accuracy of sestamibi testing in experienced hands. It is not possible to obtain images of adequate quality in all patients. Coronary angiography (cardiac catheterisation) This procedure enables the cardiologist to visualise the coronary arteries It is the standard against which other less-invasive investigations are assessed. Selective catheterisation of the right and left coronary ostia is performed. Contrast is then injected into the vessels and digital tape or disc storage of the images obtained. In most hospitals the patient is admitted on the morning of the test and allowed to go home that afternoon. The procedure is most often performed through the femoral artery (Judkins technique) . This artery can be punctured through the skin under local anaesthetic. A fine softtipped guide wire is then advanced into the artery and the needle withdrawn (Seldinger method). A short guiding sheath can then be placed over the wire and long cardiac catheters advanced through this sheath along a long guide wire into the femoral artery and up via the aorta to the aortic arch. The catheter and wire are advanced under X-ray control. Usually one catheter with a curved tip (pig-tail catheter;is advanced across the aortic valve into the left ventricle where left ventricular pressures are measured via a pressure transducer connected to the other end of the catheter. Measurement of the left ventricular end-diastolic pressure gives an indication of left ventricular function. Raised end-diastolic pressure (over 15 mmHg) suggests left ventricular dysfunction . The catheter is then connected to a pressure injector. This enables injection of a large volume of contrast over a few seconds; for example, 35 mL at 15 mL/second. X-ray recording during injection produces a left ventriculogram Here left ventricular contraction can be assessed and the ejection fraction (percentage of end-diastolic volume ejected with each systole) estimated. The normal is 60% or more. The figure obtained by this method tends to be higher than that produced by the nuclear imaging method—gated blood pool scanning. The guide wire is reintroduced and the catheter withdrawn to be replaced by one shaped to
Echocardiologist in Kattigenahalli, Bangalore • Stress echocardiography Ischaemic areas of myocardium are known to have reduced contraction compared with normal areas. This can be demonstrated by high-quality echocardiograms. A number of standard views of the heart are obtained and the wall is divided into regions that are assessed for reduced motion. The echo equipment must be designed to store rest images and to present them next to stress images on a split screen so that direct comparison can be made. The stress can be provided by exercise or dobutamine infusion. Exercise echocardiography is difficult to perform because of movement problems and there is quite high inter-reporter variability, but both techniques can approach the accuracy of sestamibi testing in experienced hands. It is not possible to obtain images of adequate quality in all patients.
Echocardiologist in Kattigenahalli, Bangalore • Stress echocardiography Ischaemic areas of myocardium are known to have reduced contraction compared with normal areas. This can be demonstrated by high-quality echocardiograms. A number of standard views of the heart are obtained and the wall is divided into regions that are assessed for reduced motion. The echo equipment must be designed to store rest images and to present them next to stress images on a split screen so that direct comparison can be made. The stress can be provided by exercise or dobutamine infusion. Exercise echocardiography is difficult to perform because of movement problems and there is quite high inter-reporter variability, but both techniques can approach the accuracy of sestamibi testing in experienced hands. It is not possible to obtain images of adequate quality in all patients.
DIABETIC SPECIALIST IN YALAHANKA Syncope and dizziness The history Syncope is a transient loss of consciousness resulting from cerebral anoxia, usually due to inadequate blood flow. Syncope may represent a simple faint or be a symptom of cardiac or neurological disease. Establish whether the patient actually loses consciousness and under what circumstances the syncope occurs—for example, on standing for prolonged periods or standing up suddenly (postural syncope), while passing urine (micturition syncope), on coughing (tussive syncope) or with sudden emotional stress (vasovagal syncope). Find out whether there is any warning such as dizziness or palpitations, and how long the episodes last. Recovery may be spontaneous or require attention from bystanders. Bystanders may also have noticed abnormal movements if the patient has epilepsy, but these can also occur in primary syncope. If the patient’s symptoms appear to be postural, enquire about the use of anti-hypertensive or anti-anginal drugs and other medications that may induce postural hypotension. If the episode is vasovagal, it may be precipitated by something unpleasant like the sight of blood, or it may occur in a hot crowded room; patients often feel nauseated and sweaty before fainting and may have had prior similar episodes, especially during adolescence and young adulthood. The diagnosis of this relatively benign and very common cause of syncope can usually be made from the history. Patients with very typical symptoms rarely require extensive investigations. If syncope is due to an arrhythmia there is often sudden loss of consciousness regardless of the patient’s posture. A history of rapid and irregular palpitations or a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation in the past suggests the possibility of sick sinus syndrome. These patients have intermittent tachycardia, usually due to atrial fibrillation, and episodes of profound bradycardia, often due to complete heart block. Chest pain may also occur if the patient has aortic stenosis or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Exertional syncope may occur in these patients because of obstruction to left ventricular outflow by aortic stenosis or septal hypertrophy . Dizziness that occurs even when the patient is lying down or that is made worse by movements of the head is more likely to be of neurological origin (vertigo), although recurrent tachyarrhythmias may occasionally cause dizziness in any position. Try to decide whether the dizziness is really vertiginous (there is a sensation of movement or spinning of the surroundings or the patient’s head), or whether it is a presyncopal feeling. A family history of syncope or sudden death raises the possibility of an ion channel abnormality (long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy). Attempts should be made to find out what the diagnosis was for the affected relatives. A past history of severe structural heart disease, especially heart failure,
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