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How sleeping less than 6 hours affects your health After being awake for almost 14-16 hours, our body demands sleep. Minimum sleeping time required for a healthy mind and body is 7-8 hours. Although, this duration varies according to age. Because generally speaking, where a child can sleep for 12-14 hours, grownups can sleep for not more than 9 hours. Sound sleep is very essential otherwise, it can be harmful for our health. Let’s see how sleeping for less than 6 hours affects our health. Headache, weight gain and poor vision: When you sleep for less than 6 hours a day, it can not only give you headache all the time but can lead to a poor vision also. And if continued for a long time, may hamper your eyesight. The lesser you sleep the more weight you gain. And after-effects of gaining weight could be even more hazardous. Memory loss, heart disease, infection: Sleeplessness can have an adverse effect on one’s memory too. A person may find it difficult to remember even simple things. Also, infections can take a longer time to heal because sleep is something that stabilises and balances everything that goes wrong while we are awake. If we don’t get proper sleep, the process of healing takes longer. Lack of sleep can also elevate blood pressure which ultimately affects the heart. Urine overproduction, stammering and accident: Sleeping slows down urinating process but when you are awake for longer hours, you might have to urinate more than usual. Lack of sleep can also make you stammer while speaking. If lack of sleep continues, you may not be able to communicate properly. When you do not have sound sleep, your mental condition would not be stable because of declining concentration. You can be accident prone if you drive in such a condition. These are just a few of the ill effects. Sleeping for less than 5 hours is far more dangerous than you can even think. From behavioural to mental to physical effects, it can harm you in many more ways, So, have a sound sleep to avoid complications in life.
PAPULAR CARDIOLOGISTS IN HEBBALA ECG interpretation: points to remember 1 ECG reports should be short and based on clinical information where possible. 2 Check that the patient’s name is on the ECG and that the paper speed and calibration markers are correct. 3 Measure or estimate the heart rate—3 large squares = 100/minute. 4 Establish the rhythm. Look for P waves (best seen in L2). Are the P waves followed by QRS complexes? Look for anomalously conducted or ectopic beats. 5 Measure the intervals: PR, QRS duration and QT interval (for the latter, consult tables, but normal is less than 50% of the RR interval). 6 If the QRS complex is wide (> 3 small squares) consider the possibilities: LBBB, RBBB, WPW or ventricular rhythm or beats. If the pattern is of LBBB, there is no need in most cases to attempt further interpretation. 7 Estimate the QRS axis. In LAD, L1 and aVF diverge and L2 is predominantly negative. In RAD, L1 and aVF converge, while L2 matters little. Indeterminate axis is diagnosed when all six frontal leads are (more or less) equiphasic. 8 Check whether the criteria for LAHB or LAFB have been met. 9 Look for pathological Q waves. In general these are longer than 0.04 seconds and are more than 25% of the size of the following R wave.
POPULAR CARDIOLOGISTS IN SAHAKARANAGAR Left ventricular hypertrophy Although the ECG is reasonably specific, it is not as sensitive as echocardiography in detecting LVH. The LVH voltage alone may be a normal finding in younger subjects, but in adults over 35 years it usually connotes true LVH, especially if corroboratory findings are present Unfortunately, LVH with ST/T changes may be impossible to separate from LVH voltage complicated by ST/T changes of different, especially ischaemic, origin . Right ventricular hypertrophy The main criteria fSAor detecting RVH are RAD over +110° and a dominant R wave in V1 (in the absence of its other causes and in the presence of normal-duration QRS) In congenital heart disease conduction defects often come to obscure the hypertrophy patterns.
the best cardiologists in yelahanka new town bangalore Miscellaneous conditions Chamber hypertrophy Left ventricular hypertrophy Although the ECG is reasonably specific, it is not as sensitive as echocardiography in detecting LVH. The LVH voltage alone may be a normal finding in younger subjects, but in adults over 35 years it usually connotes true LVH, especially if corroboratory findings are present ) Unfortunately, LVH with ST/T changes may be impossible to separate from LVH voltage complicated by ST/T changes of different, especially ischaemic, origin . Right ventricular hypertrophy The main criteria for detecting RVH are RAD over +110° and a dominant R wave in V1 (in the absence of its other causes and in the presence of normal-duration QRS) . In congenital heart disease conduction defects often come to obscure the hypertrophy patterns. An atrial (AAI) pacemaker in a patient with anterior myocardial infarction of uncertain age. There is sensing (inhibition) only after some native or paced P waves. The pacemaker captures the atria whenever the latter are not refractory: there is no failure to pace. The middle capture beat is earlier than the other two and has a longer PR interval and aberrant RBBB-type ventricular conduction. This is a pacemaker sensing problem. Reprogramming may enable the pacemaker to sense a smaller atrial amplitude and be inhibited correctly. A DDD pacemaker in trouble: there is no atrial capture and the ventricular complexes are capturing the atria on their own. The retrograde P wave interrupts the T wave and triggers another paced QRS whose retrograde conduction is blocked by the original retrograde P wave. Were it not for this block, an endless loop re-entry (paced) tachycardia would occur. The paced complexes have the typical LBBB/left-axis deviation expected from right ventricular apical pacing. Failure to capture may mean the lead has been displaced or that scarring has developed between the tip of the lead and the myocardium. Sometimes, reprogramming an increase in the output of the pacemaker will fix the problem. a = atrial pacing spike (not followed by a P wave); b = ventricular pacing spike (produced after the atrial spike after a programmed AV delay and followed by a paced ventricular beat); c = retrograde P wave following ventricular paced beat; d = pause caused by blocked retrograde conduction of the previo A DDD or VDD pacemaker with intermittent failure to pace. A 4:3 pacemakerventricular block results in trigeminy even though normal sinus rhythm continues throughout. The normal
the best cardiologists in yelahanka new town bangalore Miscellaneous conditions Chamber hypertrophy Left ventricular hypertrophy Although the ECG is reasonably specific, it is not as sensitive as echocardiography in detecting LVH. The LVH voltage alone may be a normal finding in younger subjects, but in adults over 35 years it usually connotes true LVH, especially if corroboratory findings are present ) Unfortunately, LVH with ST/T changes may be impossible to separate from LVH voltage complicated by ST/T changes of different, especially ischaemic, origin . Right ventricular hypertrophy The main criteria for detecting RVH are RAD over +110° and a dominant R wave in V1 (in the absence of its other causes and in the presence of normal-duration QRS) . In congenital heart disease conduction defects often come to obscure the hypertrophy patterns. An atrial (AAI) pacemaker in a patient with anterior myocardial infarction of uncertain age. There is sensing (inhibition) only after some native or paced P waves. The pacemaker captures the atria whenever the latter are not refractory: there is no failure to pace. The middle capture beat is earlier than the other two and has a longer PR interval and aberrant RBBB-type ventricular conduction. This is a pacemaker sensing problem. Reprogramming may enable the pacemaker to sense a smaller atrial amplitude and be inhibited correctly. A DDD pacemaker in trouble: there is no atrial capture and the ventricular complexes are capturing the atria on their own. The retrograde P wave interrupts the T wave and triggers another paced QRS whose retrograde conduction is blocked by the original retrograde P wave. Were it not for this block, an endless loop re-entry (paced) tachycardia would occur. The paced complexes have the typical LBBB/left-axis deviation expected from right ventricular apical pacing. Failure to capture may mean the lead has been displaced or that scarring has developed between the tip of the lead and the myocardium. Sometimes, reprogramming an increase in the output of the pacemaker will fix the problem. a = atrial pacing spike (not followed by a P wave); b = ventricular pacing spike (produced after the atrial spike after a programmed AV delay and followed by a paced ventricular beat); c = retrograde P wave following ventricular paced beat; d = pause caused by blocked retrograde conduction of the previo A DDD or VDD pacemaker with intermittent failure to pace. A 4:3 pacemakerventricular block results in trigeminy even though normal sinus rhythm continues throughout. The normal
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