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HEART DOCTORS IN CHIKKAJALA, BANGALORE; Pulmonary hypertension Pulmonary hypertension is an uncommon but important cause of dyspnoea. Many patients with this chronic and often severe illness will have raised pulmonary artery pressures as a result of a cardiac or respiratory illness. Other patients may present with increasing dyspnoea without an obvious cardiac or respiratory problem. Idiopathic (primary) pulmonary hypertension (IPH) is diagnosed only when other causes of pulmonary hypertension have been excluded. By definition, pulmonary hypertension is present when the mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) exceeds 25 mmHg at rest or 30 mmHg during exercise. The classification of pulmonary hypertension has been revised. The Venice classification was released in 2003. The term ‘primary pulmonary hypertension’ has been replaced with ‘idiopathic pulmonary hypertension’ . Patients may have used fenfluramine or phenermine (appetite-suppressing drugs), or both. Use of these drugs for long periods has been associated with the greatest risk of developing pulmonary hypertension. In cases of IPH there may be a family history (6%; autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance, 20–80%). The majority of familial cases are associates with a mutation on the BMPR2 gene. There may be associated symptoms including fatigue, chest pain, syncope and oedema. Cough and haemoptysis can be present.
THE BEST CARDIOLOGISTS IN YELAHANKA Pulmonary hypertension Pulmonary hypertension is an uncommon but important cause of dyspnoea. Many patients with this chronic and often severe illness will have raised pulmonary artery pressures as a result of a cardiac or respiratory illness. Other patients may present with increasing dyspnoea without an obvious cardiac or respiratory problem. Idiopathic (primary) pulmonary hypertension (IPH) is diagnosed only when other causes of pulmonary hypertension have been excluded. By definition, pulmonary hypertension is present when the mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) exceeds 25 mmHg at rest or 30 mmHg during exercise. The classification of pulmonary hypertension has been revised. The Venice classification was released in 2003. The term ‘primary pulmonary hypertension’ has been replaced with ‘idiopathic pulmonary hypertension’ Patients may have used fenfluramine or phenermine (appetite-suppressing drugs), or both. Use of these drugs for long periods has been associated with the greatest risk of developing pulmonary hypertension. In cases of IPH there may be a family history (6%; autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance, 20–80%). The majority of familial cases are associates with a mutation on the BMPR2 gene. There may be associated symptoms including fatigue, chest pain, syncope and oedema. Cough and haemoptysis can be present. 270 PRACTICAL CARDIOLOGY The examination may help in assessing the severity of the patient’s dyspnoea as he or she undresses. Try to work out the patient’s functional class from the history and examination (p. 256) (NYHA I–IIII, often called the NYHA–WHO class when related to pulmonary hypertension). There may be signs of chronic lung disease or congenital heart disease, or specific signs of pulmonary hypertension and right heart failure (p. 257). Investigations are directed at finding an underlying reason for pulmonary hypertension— idiopathic pulmonary hypertension is a diagnosis of exclusion—and at assessing its severity and potential reversibility. The chest X-ray is abnormal in 90% of IPH patients. It may show pulmonary fibrosis or an abnormal cardiac silhouette—RV dilatation. There may be large proximal pulmonary arteries that appear ‘pruned’ in the periphery, and the heart may appear enlarged because of right ventricle dilatation) Respiratory function tests may show a normal, restrictive or obstructive pattern. Moderate pulmonary hypertension itself is associated with a reduction in the diffusing capacity for the carbon monoxide test (DLCO) to about 50% of predicted. On the ECG look for signs of right heart strain or hypertrophy, which are present in up to 90% of patients The blood gas measurements may show hypercapnia—elevated pCO2 in hypoventilation syndromes—but hypocapnia is more common in IPH because of increased alveolar ventilation. Mild hypoxia (reduction in pO2) may be present in IPH, and is more severe when pulmonary hypertension is secondary to lung disease. On CT pulmonary angiogram (CTPA), ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) lung scan or Doppler venograms look for a deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and PE and assess the extent of involvement of the pulmonary bed. A high-resolution CT scan of the lungs is the best way of looking for interstitial lung disease. The six-minute walking test predicts survival and correlates with the NYHA–WHO class. Reduction in arterial oxygen concentration of more than 10% during this test predicts an almost threefold mortality risk over 29 months. Patients unable to manage 332 m in six minutes also have an adverse prognosis.
DIABETIC SPECIALIST IN YALAHANKA Syncope and dizziness The history Syncope is a transient loss of consciousness resulting from cerebral anoxia, usually due to inadequate blood flow. Syncope may represent a simple faint or be a symptom of cardiac or neurological disease. Establish whether the patient actually loses consciousness and under what circumstances the syncope occurs—for example, on standing for prolonged periods or standing up suddenly (postural syncope), while passing urine (micturition syncope), on coughing (tussive syncope) or with sudden emotional stress (vasovagal syncope). Find out whether there is any warning such as dizziness or palpitations, and how long the episodes last. Recovery may be spontaneous or require attention from bystanders. Bystanders may also have noticed abnormal movements if the patient has epilepsy, but these can also occur in primary syncope. If the patient’s symptoms appear to be postural, enquire about the use of anti-hypertensive or anti-anginal drugs and other medications that may induce postural hypotension. If the episode is vasovagal, it may be precipitated by something unpleasant like the sight of blood, or it may occur in a hot crowded room; patients often feel nauseated and sweaty before fainting and may have had prior similar episodes, especially during adolescence and young adulthood. The diagnosis of this relatively benign and very common cause of syncope can usually be made from the history. Patients with very typical symptoms rarely require extensive investigations. If syncope is due to an arrhythmia there is often sudden loss of consciousness regardless of the patient’s posture. A history of rapid and irregular palpitations or a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation in the past suggests the possibility of sick sinus syndrome. These patients have intermittent tachycardia, usually due to atrial fibrillation, and episodes of profound bradycardia, often due to complete heart block. Chest pain may also occur if the patient has aortic stenosis or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Exertional syncope may occur in these patients because of obstruction to left ventricular outflow by aortic stenosis or septal hypertrophy . Dizziness that occurs even when the patient is lying down or that is made worse by movements of the head is more likely to be of neurological origin (vertigo), although recurrent tachyarrhythmias may occasionally cause dizziness in any position. Try to decide whether the dizziness is really vertiginous (there is a sensation of movement or spinning of the surroundings or the patient’s head), or whether it is a presyncopal feeling. A family history of syncope or sudden death raises the possibility of an ion channel abnormality (long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy). Attempts should be made to find out what the diagnosis was for the affected relatives. A past history of severe structural heart disease, especially heart failure,
Popular cardiologists in Kodigehalli Pulmonary hypertension Pulmonary hypertension is an uncommon but important cause of dyspnoea. Many patients with this chronic and often severe illness will have raised pulmonary artery pressures as a result of a cardiac or respiratory illness. Other patients may present with increasing dyspnoea without an obvious cardiac or respiratory problem. Idiopathic (primary) pulmonary hypertension (IPH) is diagnosed only when other causes of pulmonary hypertension have been excluded. By definition, pulmonary hypertension is present when the mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) exceeds 25 mmHg at rest or 30 mmHg during exercise. The classification of pulmonary hypertension has been revised. . The term ‘primary pulmonary hypertension’ has been replaced with ‘idiopathic pulmonary hypertension’ Patients may have used fenfluramine or phenermine (appetite-suppressing drugs), or both. Use of these drugs for long periods has been associated with the greatest risk of developing pulmonary hypertension. In cases of IPH there may be a family history (6%; autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance, 20–80%). The majority of familial cases are associates with a mutation on the BMPR2 gene. There may be associated symptoms including fatigue, chest pain, syncope and oedema. Cough and haemoptysis can be present.
Popular cardiologists in Kodigehalli Pulmonary hypertension Pulmonary hypertension is an uncommon but important cause of dyspnoea. Many patients with this chronic and often severe illness will have raised pulmonary artery pressures as a result of a cardiac or respiratory illness. Other patients may present with increasing dyspnoea without an obvious cardiac or respiratory problem. Idiopathic (primary) pulmonary hypertension (IPH) is diagnosed only when other causes of pulmonary hypertension have been excluded. By definition, pulmonary hypertension is present when the mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) exceeds 25 mmHg at rest or 30 mmHg during exercise. The classification of pulmonary hypertension has been revised. . The term ‘primary pulmonary hypertension’ has been replaced with ‘idiopathic pulmonary hypertension’ Patients may have used fenfluramine or phenermine (appetite-suppressing drugs), or both. Use of these drugs for long periods has been associated with the greatest risk of developing pulmonary hypertension. In cases of IPH there may be a family history (6%; autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance, 20–80%). The majority of familial cases are associates with a mutation on the BMPR2 gene. There may be associated symptoms including fatigue, chest pain, syncope and oedema. Cough and haemoptysis can be present.
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