http://WWW.HEARTDIABETESCARE.COM
SAMIKSHAHEARTCARE 57698d5b9ec66b0b6cfb5b6b False 536 1
OK
background image not found
Found Update results for
'choice'
5
heart doctors in Sahakara Nagar, Bangalore • A clinical approach to hypertension The aims of assessing the hypertensive patient are to: n assess the severity of hypertension n identify any secondary causes n identify aggravating factors n identify target organ damage n assess and manage coexisting CVD risk factors n identify factors affecting the choice of treatment n establish baseline clinical and laboratory data
PAPULAR CARDIOL0GISTS IN BANGALORE A clinical approach to hypertension The aims of assessing the hypertensive patient are to: assess the severity of hypertension identify any secondary causes identify aggravating factors identify target organ damage assess and manage coexisting CVD risk factors identify factors affecting the choice of treatment establish baseline clinical and laboratory data.
THE BEST CARDIOLOGIST IN YELAHANKA A clinical approach to hypertension The aims of assessing the hypertensive patient are to: assess the severity of hypertension identify any secondary causes identify aggravating factors identify target organ damage assess and manage coexisting CVD risk factors identify factors affecting the choice of treatment establish baseline clinical and laboratory data.
THE BEST HEART SPECIALISTS IN BANGALORE Angioplasty Balloon dilatation of coronary artery stenoses was first performed in the late 1970s by Andreas Grunzig. The technique has undergone many refinements and is now widely used for the treatment of angina not responding to medical treatment. Angioplasty has not been shown to improve the prognosis of patients with stable angina. Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) has similarly not been shown to prolong life for most stable angina patients. However, both treatments are very successful in relieving the symptoms of angina. The COURAGE Trial compared optimal medical treatment of angina with angioplasty but excluded patients with symptoms refractory to medical treatment.1 Not surprisingly, this group of stable mild angina patients had a similar outcome with angioplasty and medical treatment. The trial suggests that compared with optimal medical treatment, angioplasty is a safe and slightly more effective treatment for stable angina. Patients can make an informed choice between these two treatments. The majority of patients treated with angioplasty in Australia have acute coronary syndromes and here there is good evidence of prognostic benefit with angioplasty compared with medical treatment. In many centres one-, two- and complicated three-vessel disease are managed this way. It has been shown to be as effective as coronary surgery for these patients but at the price of a higher rate of re-intervention. This is because the greatest limitation of angioplasty is the rate of restenosis in vessels that have been dilated. Restenosis
CARDIOLOGY DOCTORS IN BANNERGHTTA ROAD ST elevation myocardial infarction Modern treatment of myocardial infarction has made a profound difference to the prognosis of this life-threatening condition. Before the introduction of CCUs, the expected in-hospital mortality of this condition was more than 20%. Monitoring and treatment of arrhythmias, and correction of biochemical and, where possible, haemodynamic complications in CCUs reduced this to about 12%. The ‘thrombolytic era’, which began with the publication of the results of the GISSI Trial, 31 has dramatically changed the approach to the management of infarction. The use of thrombolytic drugs (streptokinase in GISSI) reduced mortality to less than 10%, with greater benefit for those treated early.32 The addition of aspirin in later trials reduced mortality to about 7% and many CCUs now achieve mortality rates of 5 or 6%. There is no doubt that early treatment makes the greatest difference, but some benefit may be seen with treatment given up to 12 hours after the onset of symptoms of infarction. In centres where it can be performed primary angioplasty is the reperfusion treatment of choice for myocardial infarction. This is a grade A recommendation—level I evidence.33 Mortality rates below 5% can be achieved. The rationale for reperfusion treatment came with the realisation that infarction was caused by thrombosis within a coronary artery (a mechanism first proposed by Herrick in 191234) and that restoring blood flow before irreversible damage had occurred would be helpful. It has been known for a long time that the prognosis following myocardial infarction depends more than anything else on the amount of left ventricular damage that has occurred. For these reasons the early diagnosis of infarction has become very important. Patients with symptoms suggestive of infarction should have an ECG performed as soon as possible. If nondiagnostic changes are present, the tracing should be repeated frequently so that appropriate early decisions about treatment can be made if changes appear. The current ECG criteria for the use of reperfusion treatment (primary angioplasty
1
false