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Diabetes clinics in Bettahalasur, Bangalore • The genetic dyslipidaemias Disorder Defect Lipoprotein elevation Clinical findings Pattern Drug treatment Familial chylomicronaemia Lipoprotein lipase defect Chylomicrons Eruptive xanthomata Pancreatitis I None Familial chylomicronaemia Apolipoprotein CII deficiency Chylomicrons, VLDL Pancreatitis I, V None Familial type III (dysbetalipoproteinaemia) Apolipoprotein BIE receptor deficiency Chylomicron remnants Eruptive xanthomata Atherosclerosis III IIa, IIb IV Fibrates Statins Nicotinic acid Familial hypercholestrolaemia (AUTO DOM 1:1500) Deficient LDL receptor LDL Xanthomata Atherosclerosis IIa Resin Statins Familial hypertriglyceridaemia Defect unknown VLDL Xanthomata IV Fibrates Nicotinic acid Multiple lipoprotein hyperlipidaemia Defect unknown LDL, VLDL Atherosclerosis IIa, IIb IV Fibrates Nicotinic acid Statins AUTO DOM = autosomal dominant inheritance; LDL = low-density lipoproteins; VLDL = very low-density lipoproteins.
HEART SPECIALISTS IN YELAHANKA NEW TOWN BANGALORE The causes of coronary symptoms The symptoms of coronary artery disease are caused by the reduction of myocardial perfusion that results from narrowing of the lumen of one or more of the coronary arteries. This narrowing is most often the result of atherosclerosis. Other much less common causes include: 1 coronary artery spasm (often in an already diseased segment of artery but sometimes as a result of the use of cocaine) 2 thrombosis (usually on an already diseased, or occasionally aneurismal, segment) 3 embolism (e.g. from an infected aortic valve) 4 congenital coronary abnormality 5 vasculitis. Numerous other cardiac symptoms and problems can be the eventual result of atheromatous coronary disease. These include myocardial infarction , cardiac failure cardiac arrhythmias and some cardiac valve problems. Risk factor mechanisms of action Atherosclerosis is thought to result primarily from a disturbance of the vascular endothelium. The final common pathway for the effects of endothelial dysfunction is largely through abnormalities of nitric oxide (NO) production. This chemical, released by a healthy endothelium, is a potent vasodilator and has anti-inflammatory and other favourable actions on the arteries. Causes of this disturbance can be: n mechanical (hypertension) n chemical (oxidised lipids, components of cigarette smoke, hyperinsulinaemia) or n due to immunological injury. The damaged endothelium attracts inflammatory mediators, platelets and circulating lipids and promotes fibroblast and smooth muscle proliferation. This results in the formation of a plaque, which may narrow the arterial lumen. Plaques can remain stable (or sometimes regress), enlarge, rupture or erode (more common in diabetics). Most acute ischaemic events (acute coronary syndromes or acute myocardial infarctions) are thought to be the result of further luminal narrowing caused by the formation of partly or fully occlusive thrombus on a ruptured or eroded plaque. Coronary risk factors may therefore operate because they are atherogenic or thrombogenic. Plaque rupture Plaque rupture may be at least partly an inflammatory process involving inflammatory cells, cytokines and even bacteria. This may explain the association between inflammatory markers such as high-sensitivity C reactive protein (hsCRP) and a risk of acute coronary events. Although this association seems well established, there is still uncertainty about its role in overall risk assessment Plaques at risk of rupture are called vulnerable plaques. They typically have a thin fibrous cap. The shoulde of these caps are at risk of rupturing and allowing material from within the plaque to come
The causes of coronary symptoms The symptoms of coronary artery disease are caused by the reduction of myocardial perfusion that results from narrowing of the lumen of one or more of the coronary arteries. This narrowing is most often the result of atherosclerosis. Other much less common causes include: 1 coronary artery spasm (p. 146) (often in an already diseased segment of artery but sometimes as a result of the use of cocaine) 2 thrombosis (usually on an already diseased, or occasionally aneurismal, segment) 3 embolism (e.g. from an infected aortic valve) 4 congenital coronary abnormality
The causes of coronary symptoms The symptoms of coronary artery disease are caused by the reduction of myocardial perfusion that results from narrowing of the lumen of one or more of the coronary arteries. This narrowing is most often the result of atherosclerosis. Other much less common causes include: 1 coronary artery spasm (p. 146) (often in an already diseased segment of artery but sometimes as a result of the use of cocaine) 2 thrombosis (usually on an already diseased, or occasionally aneurismal, segment) 3 embolism (e.g. from an infected aortic valve) 4 congenital coronary abnormality HEART SPECIALIST IN YELAHANKA
CARDIOLOGIST IN SAHAKARANAGAR The causes of coronary symptoms The symptoms of coronary artery disease are caused by the reduction of myocardial perfusion that results from narrowing of the lumen of one or more of the coronary arteries. This narrowing is most often the result of atherosclerosis. Other much less common causes include: 1 coronary artery spasm (p. 146) (often in an already diseased segment of artery but sometimes as a result of the use of cocaine) 2 thrombosis (usually on an already diseased, or occasionally aneurismal, segment) 3 embolism (e.g. from an infected aortic valve) 4 congenital coronary abnormality 5 vasculitis.
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