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HEART DOCTORS IN CHIKKAJALA, BANGALORE; Pulmonary hypertension Pulmonary hypertension is an uncommon but important cause of dyspnoea. Many patients with this chronic and often severe illness will have raised pulmonary artery pressures as a result of a cardiac or respiratory illness. Other patients may present with increasing dyspnoea without an obvious cardiac or respiratory problem. Idiopathic (primary) pulmonary hypertension (IPH) is diagnosed only when other causes of pulmonary hypertension have been excluded. By definition, pulmonary hypertension is present when the mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) exceeds 25 mmHg at rest or 30 mmHg during exercise. The classification of pulmonary hypertension has been revised. The Venice classification was released in 2003. The term ‘primary pulmonary hypertension’ has been replaced with ‘idiopathic pulmonary hypertension’ . Patients may have used fenfluramine or phenermine (appetite-suppressing drugs), or both. Use of these drugs for long periods has been associated with the greatest risk of developing pulmonary hypertension. In cases of IPH there may be a family history (6%; autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance, 20–80%). The majority of familial cases are associates with a mutation on the BMPR2 gene. There may be associated symptoms including fatigue, chest pain, syncope and oedema. Cough and haemoptysis can be present.
The use of invasive hemodynamic monitoring is based on the following principal factors: 1. Difficulty in interpreting clinical and radiographic findings of pulmonary congestion even after a thorough review of noninvasive studies such as an echo-cardiogram. 2. Need for identifying noncardiac causes of arterial hypotension, particularly hypovolemia. 3. Possible contribution of reduced ventricular compliance to impaired hemodynamics, requiring judicious adjustment of intravascular volume to optimize left ventricular filling pressure. 4. Difficulty in assessing the severity and sometimes even determining the presence of lesions such as mitral regurgitation and ventricular septal defect when the cardiac output or the systemic pressures are depressed. 5. Establishing a baseline of hemodynamic measurements and guiding therapy in patients with clinically apparent pulmonary edema or cardiogenic shock. 6. Underestimation of systemic arterial pressure by the cuff method in patients with intense vasoconstriction. The prognosis and the clinical status of patients with STEMI relate to both the cardiac output and the pulmonary artery wedge pressure. Patients
CARDIOLOGY DOCTORS IN HOSUR ROAD Pulmonary embolism This is not quite a cardiac condition and not quite a respiratory condition but it is often managed by cardiologists. Modern CT pulmonary angiography is very sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of PE. A negative scan that is of good quality effectively excludes the diagnosis. The scans are so sensitive that small distal emboli may be detected in patients who do not have convincing symptoms of embolism. This poses a therapeutic problem that may be avoided if scans are not ordered inappropriately. Some patients cannot have a CTPA, usually because of renal impairment that would make the injection of contrast risky. A V/Q nuclear scan is then a reasonable alternative to a CTPA. These scans are less accurate than CT pulmonary angiography but the clinical suspicion of PE and a lung scan reported as intermediate or high probability is an indication for treatment. Patients should be admitted to hospital and treatment begun with intravenous heparin or subcutaneous low molecular weight heparin. The latter has the advantage that the dose is determined by body weight and repeated measurements of clotting times are not required. In some cases it may be possible to treat patients with small pulmonary emboli at home with supervised low molecular weight heparin. Either way, soon after diagnosis patients should be started on oral anticoagulation treatment with warfarin. A stable INR may often be achieved within five days or so, the heparin ceased and the patient discharged. Most patients with dyspnoea as a result of PE begin to feel better within a few days of starting treatment. It is often difficult to know how long to continue treatment with warfarin. The usual recommendation for an uncomplicated first PE is three to six months. Recurrent PE may be an indication for lifelong treatment. It also suggests a need to investigate for clotting abnormalities (e.g. anti-thrombin III deficiency, protein S and protein C deficiency, abnormal Factor V and anti-nuclear antibody). A very large and life-threatening PE which is associated with the sudden onset of severe dyspnoea and hypotension may be an indication for thrombolytic treatment. An echocardiogram may show abnormal right ventricular function in these ill patients and help in the decision. Experience with this is limited and the optimum regimen is not really known. Tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) is now indicated for this purpose and current recommendations are for a 10 mg bolus over two minutes followed by 90 mg over two hours.
It may also improve arterial oxygenation by reducing pulmonary vascular congestion DIURETICS. Mild heart failure responds well to diuretics such as furosemide, Dose - 10 to 40 mg, repeated at 3- to 4-hour intervals if necessary. It reduces pulmonary capillary pressure reduces dyspnea. Decreased LVDV↓ LV wall tension - ↓ myocardial oxygen requirements and may lead to improvement of contractility and augmentation of the ejection fraction, stroke volume, and cardiac output. The reduction of elevated left ventricular filling pressure may also enhance myocardial oxygen delivery by diminishing the impedance to coronary perfusion attributable to elevated ventricular wall tension. .
Left Ventricular Failure Single most important predictor of mortality following STEMI in patients with STEMI Systolic dysfunction alone or both systolic and diastolic dysfunction can occur. LVDD leads to pulmonary venous hypertension and pulmonary congestion. Systolic dysfunction - ↓ cardiac output and of the ejection fraction. Predictors of LVF infarct size, advanced age and diabetes.[190] Mortality increases in association with the severity of the hemodynamic deficit.
This ordinarily consists of monitoring of  is suspected. heart rate and rhythm,  repeated measurement of systemic arterial pressure by cuff,  obtaining chest radiographs to detect heart failure,  repeated auscultation of the lung fields for pulmonary congestion,  measurement of urine flow,  examination of the skin and mucous membranes for evidence of the adequacy of perfusion, and
Indications for Hemodynamic Monitoring in Patients with STEMI Management of complicated acute myocardial infarction Hypovolemia versus cardiogenic shock Ventricular septal rupture versus acute mitral regurgitation Severe left ventricular failure Right ventricular failure Refractory ventricular tachycadia Differentiating severe pulmonary disease from left ventricular failure Assessment of cardiac tamponade Assessment of therapy in selected individuals Afterload reduction in patients with severe left ventricular failure Inotropic agent therapy Beta-blocker therapy Temporary pacing (ventricular versus atrioventricular) Intraaortic balloon counterpulsation Mechanical ventilation
THE BEST CARDIOLOGISTS IN YELAHANKA nvestigations of possible or probable stable angina Electrocardiography A standard 12-lead ECG should be obtained in all patients. This is likely to be normal in almost half of patients with subsequently proven coronary artery disease. Nevertheless, an abnormal trace lends weight to the symptoms and favours further investigation. Chest X-ray Routine radiology is not essential but may reveal important co-morbidities. It should always be performed in those with clinical evidence of hypertension, pericarditis (p. 174), heart failure or valvular disease, if only as a baseline. It is similarly indicated for patients with suspected or known pulmonary or systemic disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, COPD or alcoholism. Routine blood tests All patients with suspected angina should have the following routine investigations at presentation (NHF grade A recommendation): n fasting lipids, including total cholesterol, LDLs, HDLs and triglycerides—risk factors n fasting blood sugar—risk factor n full blood count—anaemia exacerbates angina n serum creatinine—impaired renal function is a risk factor and can be worsened by some cardiac investigations. If indicated clinically, thyroid function
POPULAR CARDIOLOGISTS IN SAHAKARANAGAR Cardiomyopathies and valvular heart disease Regardless of the status of the coronary arterial tree, both primary and secondary heart muscle disease can produce anginal pain through the imbalance of the oxygen demand and supply. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a relatively common cause of angina in the presence of normal coronary arteries. Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular cause of exertional chest tightness, which is probably due to myocardial ischaemia Exertional chest pain, which may be due to right ventricular angina, is a feature of pulmonary hypertension . Syndrome X There is some confusion regarding the ‘metabolic’ and ‘cardiac’ varieties. The former is a combination of insulin resistance, obesity, pro-inflammatory state and so on, leading to raised cardiovascular risk in the sufferers. The latter is, or should be, a form of stable effort angina that can be ascribed to coronary microvascular malfunction.23 The epicardial coronary tree is normal and the diagnosis is rather difficult to make except by exclusion. Acute coronary syndromes The terminology used to describe acute coronary syndromes (ACSs) continues to evolve as clinicians attempt to adjust to the accumulating evidence of the usefulness of modern cardiac markers and the treatment implications of different results. The most recent terminology is designed to help with treatment decisions based on the earliest clinical information from the patient. This comes from the history and the ECG. When the patient’s symptoms suggest an acute coronary syndrome, the first decisions about diagnosis and treatment are based on the ECG. If there is ST elevation present in a pattern to suggest myocardial infarction, the diagnosis is of ‘ST elevation myocardial infarction’ (STEMI). If there is no ST elevation, the initial diagnosis is of ‘non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome’ (NSTEACS).24 This elegant phrase has replaced ‘non-ST elevation myocardial infarction’ (non- STEMI). The reason is that the diagnosis of infarction cannot be made in the absence of ST elevation until cardiac marker estimations are available. The decisions about treatment, however, need to be made immediately and are based on symptoms and ECG changes.
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