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How sleeping less than 6 hours affects your health After being awake for almost 14-16 hours, our body demands sleep. Minimum sleeping time required for a healthy mind and body is 7-8 hours. Although, this duration varies according to age. Because generally speaking, where a child can sleep for 12-14 hours, grownups can sleep for not more than 9 hours. Sound sleep is very essential otherwise, it can be harmful for our health. Let’s see how sleeping for less than 6 hours affects our health. Headache, weight gain and poor vision: When you sleep for less than 6 hours a day, it can not only give you headache all the time but can lead to a poor vision also. And if continued for a long time, may hamper your eyesight. The lesser you sleep the more weight you gain. And after-effects of gaining weight could be even more hazardous. Memory loss, heart disease, infection: Sleeplessness can have an adverse effect on one’s memory too. A person may find it difficult to remember even simple things. Also, infections can take a longer time to heal because sleep is something that stabilises and balances everything that goes wrong while we are awake. If we don’t get proper sleep, the process of healing takes longer. Lack of sleep can also elevate blood pressure which ultimately affects the heart. Urine overproduction, stammering and accident: Sleeping slows down urinating process but when you are awake for longer hours, you might have to urinate more than usual. Lack of sleep can also make you stammer while speaking. If lack of sleep continues, you may not be able to communicate properly. When you do not have sound sleep, your mental condition would not be stable because of declining concentration. You can be accident prone if you drive in such a condition. These are just a few of the ill effects. Sleeping for less than 5 hours is far more dangerous than you can even think. From behavioural to mental to physical effects, it can harm you in many more ways, So, have a sound sleep to avoid complications in life.
THE BEST HEART SPECIALIST S IN YELAHANKA ST segment There are two aspects to report: depression and elevation. Depression The ST segment is said to be abnormal if it slopes down 1 mm or more from the J point—the end of the QRS complex (downsloping depression)—or is depressed 1 mm or more horizontally (plane depression). Depression of the J point itself may be normal, especially during exercise, but this upsloping ST depression should return to the isoelectric line within 0.08 seconds. The isoelectric line is defined as the PR or TP segment of the ECG . ST depression may be due to ischaemia, the effect of digoxin, hypertrophy and so on. Elevation ST elevation of up to 3 mm may be normal in V leads (especially the right), and up to 1 mm may be normal in limb leads. This ST elevation is called early repolarisation syndrome or pattern. Otherwise ST elevation may mean an acute myocardial infarction where it is said to represent a current of injury. Pericarditis also causes ST elevation but unlike infarction is usually associated with concave upwards elevation. hypertrophy and conduction defects like LBBB can be associated with ST elevation in leads where the QRS is mostly negative. T waves The T wave is always inverted in lead aVR and often in L3 and V1–V2, and in aVL if the R wave is less than 5 mm tall. Inversion and flattening are common and non-specific findings. Deep (> 5 mm) symmetrical and persistent (days to weeks) inversion is consistent with infarction; broad, ‘giant’ inversion may follow syncope from any cause including cerebrovascular accidents. Like the ST segment, the T wave tends to be directed opposite to the main QRS deflection in conduction defects (e.g. LBBB), VEBs or ventricular hypertrophy (where it is described as secondary ST/T changes or strain pattern). Tall peaked T waves are most often seen as a reciprocal change to inferior or posterior infarcts. They are classically seen in patients with hyperkalaemia. Broader large T waves are seen in early (‘hyperacute’) infarction and sometimes in cerebrovascular accidents. While not diagnostic by themselves (T waves never are), when they are associated with modest ST elevation (especially in V3) and reciprocal depression in the inferior leads, they indicate infarction or ischaemia. When these changes evolve over time they are even more specific for infarction A U wave may be prominent in patients with hypokalaemia, LVH and bradycardia. Isolated
CARDIAC CENTERS IN YELAHANKA NEW TOWN BANGALORE ST segment There are two aspects to report: depression and elevation. Depression The ST segment is said to be abnormal if it slopes down 1 mm or more from the J point—the end of the QRS complex (downsloping depression)—or is depressed 1 mm or more horizontally (plane depression). Depression of the J point itself may be normal, especially during exercise, but this upsloping ST depression should return to the isoelectric line within 0.08 seconds. The isoelectric line is defined as the PR or TP segment of the ECG . ST depression may be due to ischaemia, the effect of digoxin, hypertrophy and so on. Elevation ST elevation of up to 3 mm may be normal in V leads (especially the right), and up to 1 mm may be normal in limb leads. This ST elevation is called early repolarisation syndrome or pattern. Otherwise ST elevation may mean an acute myocardial infarction where it is said to represent a current of injury. Pericarditis also causes ST elevation but unlike infarction is usually associated with concave upwards elevation. hypertrophy and conduction defects like LBBB can be associated with ST elevation in leads where the QRS is mostly negative. T waves The T wave is always inverted in lead aVR and often in L3 and V1–V2, and in aVL if the R wave is less than 5 mm tall. Inversion and flattening are common and non-specific findings. Deep (> 5 mm) symmetrical and persistent (days to weeks) inversion is consistent with infarction; broad, ‘giant’ inversion may follow syncope from any cause including cerebrovascular accidents. Like the ST segment, the T wave tends to be directed opposite to the main QRS deflection in conduction defects (e.g. LBBB), VEBs or ventricular hypertrophy (where it is described as secondary ST/T changes or strain pattern). Tall peaked T waves are most often seen as a reciprocal change to inferior or posterior infarcts. They are classically seen in patients with hyperkalaemia. Broader large T waves are seen in early (‘hyperacute’) infarction and sometimes in cerebrovascular accidents. While not diagnostic by themselves (T waves never are), when they are associated with modest ST elevation (especially in V3) and reciprocal depression in the inferior leads, they indicate infarction or ischaemia. When these changes evolve over time they are even more specific for infarction . A U wave may be prominent in patients with hypokalaemia, LVH and bradycardia. Isolated U inversion is a specific but insensitive sign of coronary disease. 54 PRACTICAL CARDIOLOGY ECG reports Reports should be short and stereotyped, with the description clearly separated from the comment. It is a good general strategy to under-report, especially for a beginner. It is generally wiser to state ‘inferior Q waves noted’ or ‘non-specific ST/T changes’ than to indulge in speculation on possible or probable infarction or ischaemia. ECG labels tend to have serious employment and insurance implications. On the other hand, specific questions on the request form must be addressed, since they constitute the reason for taking the ECG in the first place.
THE BEST CARDIOLOGISTS IN YELAHANKA NEWTOWN BANGALORE ST segment There are two aspects to report: depression and elevation. Depression The ST segment is said to be abnormal if it slopes down 1 mm or more from the J point—the end of the QRS complex (downsloping depression)—or is depressed 1 mm or more horizontally (plane depression). Depression of the J point itself may be normal, especially during exercise, but this upsloping ST depression should return to the isoelectric line within 0.08 seconds. The isoelectric line is defined as the PR or TP segment of the ECG ST depression may be due to ischaemia, the effect of digoxin, hypertrophy and so on. Elevation ST elevation of up to 3 mm may be normal in V leads (especially the right), and up to 1 mm may be normal in limb leads. This ST elevation is called early repolarisation syndrome or pattern. Otherwise ST elevation may mean an acute myocardial infarction where it is said to represent a current of injury. Pericarditis also causes ST elevation but unlike infarction is usually associated with concave upwards elevation . hypertrophy and conduction defects like LBBB can be associated with ST elevation in leads where the QRS is mostly negative. T waves The T wave is always inverted in lead aVR and often in L3 and V1–V2, and in aVL if the R wave is less than 5 mm tall. Inversion and flattening are common and non-specific findings. Deep (> 5 mm) symmetrical and persistent (days to weeks) inversion is consistent with infarction; broad, ‘giant’ inversion may follow syncope from any cause including cerebrovascular accidents. Like the ST segment, the T wave tends to be directed opposite to the main QRS deflection in conduction defects (e.g. LBBB), VEBs ) or ventricular hypertrophy (where it is described as secondary ST/T changes or strain pattern). Tall peaked T waves are most often seen as a reciprocal change to inferior or posterior infarcts. They are classically seen in patients with hyperkalaemia. Broader large T waves are seen in early (‘hyperacute’) infarction and sometimes in cerebrovascular accidents. While not diagnostic by themselves (T waves never are), when they are associated with modest ST elevation (especially in V3) and reciprocal depression in the inferior leads, they indicate infarction or ischaemia. When these changes evolve over time they are even more specific for infarction A U wave may be prominent in patients with hypokalaemia, LVH and bradycardia. Isolated U inversion
heart doctors in Doddabommasandra, Bangalore • Thrombolysis Contraindications to thrombolytic (fibrinolytic) treatment The following important contraindications to thrombolytic treatment must be considered rapidly before a decision to treat is made. They mostly relate to bleeding problems or risk. 1 Prolonged resuscitation following a cardiac arrest. Brief periods of cardiac massage should not prevent treatment. 2 Active peptic ulcer disease. 3 A recent surgical operation (up to 10 days, depending on the extent of the operation). 4 A previous haemorrhagic stroke. 5 Previous use of streptokinase probably means that agent should not be used again. Antibodies develop quickly and may cause allergic reactions and reduce the effectiveness of the drug. The usual approach is to use tissue plasminogen activator for these patients. 6 Diabetic retinopathy with a history of retinal haemorrhage. Thrombolytic treatment can be begun in the accident and emergency department or, if transfer is not delayed, in the CCU. Some successful trials of administration by ambulance officers have been conducted. This is especially useful if transfer to hospital is likely to take a long time. Staff in the department where the drug is given must be well informed about complications and their management. Some patients develop hypotension after the commencement of streptokinase. The drug infusion rate should then be slowed but not stopped. Reperfusion arrhythmias may develop in response to lysis (or balloon dilatation) of the thrombus. It is thought that metabolites washed from the ischaemic zone down the newly patent artery can cause electrical instability. These arrhythmias are usually self-limiting but occasionally ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation may occur. This is always awkward if it occurs in the lift on the way to the CCU. Other irregularities such as flurries of ventricular ectopics, periods of accelerated idioventricular rhythm (AIVR) or fascicular VT may occur. Successful thrombolysis may be difficult to diagnose at the bedside but the relief of pain,
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